A couple of weeks ago, we received an email from a customer in Swansea named Mr M. He was concerned about a weed that was threatening to take over his lawn - here's the photo he sent us:

Parsley piert lawn weed

Mr M had noticed this weed before, but this year, it was appearing in far more spots - and in far greater quantities. The weed network had substantial roots that were proving difficult to pull out, and worryingly, weed control treatments didn't seem to be helping.

So Mr M contacted Lawn & Weed Expert with two questions: what was this stubborn weed, and was there anything we could do about it?

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when do daisies bloom

Daisies are a native, perennial plant that can be found in most lawns across the UK. Many of us have great memories of plucking these off the school field and creating daisy chains, but as cute as they are, daisies are considered a weed by most gardeners. 

Knowing when daisies bloom can help you be prepared for their emergence so you can deal with them quickly and efficiently! So, when do daisies bloom?

What time of year do daisies bloom?

Like most plants, daisies bloom seasonally. The first daisies start to emerge in spring (March) and the last daisies of the year bloom at the start of autumn (October) when the weather starts to get colder again. 

If autumn/winter happens to be very mild one year, daisies can continue to bloom all year round, but their most prevalent blooming months are April to June when growing conditions are perfect. 

Daisies are one of the most common lawn weeds because they can grow pretty much anywhere. Whether your soil is acidic or alkaline, aerated or compacted, daisies will find a way to bloom. It's important that you keep your eye out for daisy blooms and choose a daisy management strategy that works for you.

How can I manage daisies blooming in my lawn?

If you want to manage the daisies in your lawn there are a few different approaches you can take. For small patches of daisies, you should be able to remove them by hand using a sharp gardening tool eg. shears. 

To remove larger patches of daisies, you should mow your lawn regularly. Bear in mind that mowing the lawn is great for removing the daisy blooms, but it might not prevent the daisies from spreading to other areas of your garden in the future. Any daisy heads that land on the soil could germinate and create a new daisy problem.

Read more: How to Remove Daisies from Your Lawn

Here at Lawn and Weed Expert, we offer professional weed removal services that will help you get a daisy infestation under control in no time! Give us a call on 0800 111 4958 if you have any questions.

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Dandelions growing in grass

The common dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) is very pretty, and it has a number of uses in both cookery and herbal medicine. But if you want an immaculate, weed-free lawn, dandelions can also cause a lot of frustration - this plant is very unfussy about where it grows, and the long tap root makes it difficult to get rid of.

If you're looking for dandelion removal tips, see our blog on How to Rid Your Lawn of Dandelions. In today's post, we're going to focus on when dandelions tend to appear - hopefully, this knowledge will help you to be prepared for the next wave of dandelion growth in your garden!

 

Dandelion growing cycle

Dandelions can be seen between March and October in virtually all parts of the UK. Here's a rough overview of the plant's growing cycle:

  1. Flower - The dandelion's most recognisable feature is its bright yellow flower, which can bloom from early spring onwards. The flower serves to attract bees and other pollinators.

  2. Seed Head - As this animated GIF shows, the dandelion's flower eventually closes up and develops into the puffy white seed head that you may know as a 'dandelion clock'.

  3. Spreading the Seeds - A light wind is enough to remove the seeds from their stalk and blow them away to a new home, where they will settle and grow into new plants. If you've ever picked a dandelion clock to see if you can blow all the seeds away with one puff, you have helped with this process!

  4. Leaves & Tap Root - Once a dandelion seed has found itself a decent place to settle, it sprouts leaves to capture sunlight. This light is turned into energy via photosynthesis, and the plant then uses this energy to develop the long, loathsome tap root that makes dandelions so difficult to permanently remove. It also grows a bright yellow flower, and the dandelion's growing cycle begins anew!

 

Make your lawn a dandelion-free zone!

If you'd rather not see your lawn overrun by those bright yellow flowers, Lawn & Weed Expert can help.

We offer a comprehensive weed control service, using broad-spectrum systemic herbicides to rid your lawn of dandelions as well as many other common plant species.

Ready to take the fight to your garden weeds? Call Lawn & Weed Expert on 0800 111 4958 to arrange a FREE lawn survey.

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Photo from Pixabay

Lawn weeds

If you want to keep your lawn in immaculate condition all year round, you'll need to keep an eye out for weeds. As we've discussed previously on this blog, the definition of 'weeds' is somewhat subjective, but essentially, any plant that's growing where it isn't supposed to may be considered a weed.

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Dandelion weed

As we've discussed previously (see What Makes a Plant a Weed?), there's no hard and fast rule to say which plants are weeds and which aren't. The word 'weed' can refer to any plant that's growing in a place where it isn't wanted.

Of course, some plants make weeds of themselves more often than others - see our list of common UK garden weeds for some of the most widespread examples.

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