So, you’ve changed your money, your passport is safely packed, and the dog is already raising hell at your sister’s house – everything is ready for your holiday!

Everything, that is, except your garden.

Often overshadowed by getaway fever, the back garden tends to be quite a long way down the list of priorities when holiday time rolls around. Naturally, the excitement of the trip takes over and the state of your lawn typically falls off the radar, overlooked in favour of packing and pre-journey anticipation.

That being said, for those with green fingers, gardens are a big deal and seeing all your hard work undone by a week in the sun can be heartbreaking.

Luckily, that doesn’t have to be the case! Keep your lawn in tip-top condition while you’re away on holiday using these garden-guarding hints and tips.

Look after your garden on holiday

Preparing your garden for your holiday

If you’re going away on holiday for a prolonged period of time, there are a few things that need to be sorted out before you go – especially if you want to return to the same lovely garden you left behind.

Here are a few foolproof ways to safeguard your garden when you’re not around:

Get your hands dirty

Weeds can be the bane of a gardener’s life at the best of times, but this fact is especially true during a holiday. These unscrupulous squatters compete with other plants for moisture beneath the ground, leeching water from the soil at the behest of your prize rhododendrons.

To safeguard your plants and flowers from dehydration, weed out the competition and rid your beds of these perennial pains in the butt before you head off.

Off with their heads

While the term “deadhead” could quite easily be applied to your impending mental state, post-happy hour at the poolside bar, the phrase – at least, in this context – describes the removal of flower heads when they are on their last legs. Deadheading prevents debris and directs energy into stronger growth.

It can also be beneficial to trim back emerging flowers as well. While beheading your flowers may seem a tad ruthless, it can help your plants conserve energy and power through during your time away.

Cut to the chase

Whether you’re away for five days, a week or a fortnight, cutting your grass, trimming your bushes, pruning your plants and mowing your lawn can have a profound effect on the health of your garden during your absence.

According to the Royal Horticultural Society, it’s recommended that you cut the grass twice a week during the summer months, dropping to once a week during drier periods of consistent sunshine and fine weather.

Naturally, this won’t be possible when you’re away, so be sure to trim before you go, aiming for a closer cut the longer you are away. Leaving the clippings on your lawn will also help conserve and retain moisture in the lawn while you’re away.

Make it rain

Watering your lawn, plants and flowers before you go can make a huge difference when it comes to preserving your green garden-dwellers until you come back.

Plants need water to survive, and a rainless week or two during your time away can prove too much for even the most resilient flowers. Aim to water as late as possible before you leave.

Perfect timing

If your excursion happens to coincide with a summer heatwave at home, one fantastic way to prepare for the drought is to invest in a sprinkler system or automatic irrigation product. This will see your garden watered at regular intervals while you're away, safeguarding your horticultural haven and keeping it in a heavenly condition even in your absence.

Garden equipment experts Hozelock have even developed a garden watering system that’s paired with an app for remote accessibility. Incredibly, this Cloud Controller device can be controlled from anywhere in the world, allowing you to water your garden whether you’re enjoying a G&T in London, sangria in Spain, or beers on the beach in Australia.

Keep it in the family

Finally, one of the easiest ways to ensure your garden remains green and healthy is to simply ask someone to keep an eye on your garden while you’re away.

An occasional home visit by a trusted party is a great way to ensure your house is safe during your sunny sabbatical; why not ask if they mind watering the plants while they’re there?

Whether it’s a family member, a friend or even a close neighbour, sporadic watering of plants while you're away can be a real life-saver (quite literally in the case of some flowers).

For more advice on garden maintenance and lawn care, why not give us a call on 0800 111 4958 and speak with an expert today? Alternatively, click the button below to send your query online.

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Much like a growing child, a Christmas turkey or a prize marrow at the county fayre, success in the garden can often come down to a solid feeding regimen – particularly when it comes to growing a luscious lawn.

A nutritious diet is key to healthy growth for virtually all living organisms, and you should treat your garden in the same manner. A malnourished lawn will result in a lifeless garden that’s on the fast track to a slow, colourless death.

Don’t force your lawn into a horticultural Hunger Games - keep it looking good with these lawn feeding tips from the pros here at Lawn & Weed Expert.

Lawn feeding tips

When to feed a lawn

Lawns benefit hugely from regular feeding - just about everyone knows that - but exactly how you feed your lawn can vary depending on the time of the year.

During the wintertime, your garden won’t grow much due to the low temperatures and overcast skies. On the plus side, this means less work for you!

Spring, however, is a different story. Appropriately named, this is the time to spring into action and get to work on prepping your garden for the summer sunshine that's just around the corner (in theory, at least – this is Britain, after all).

How to feed your lawn

Over the course of the springtime, it’s recommended that you begin to fertilise your lawn using your spring/summer fertiliser of choice. The RHS suggests beginning this process in late March / early April.

This process will help invigorate your lawn and prevent weeds and moss from rearing their ugly heads. If your grass begins to lose its colour as the months wear on, repeat the process between May and August.

Once you reach August, it’s recommended that you stop this process altogether. The nitrogen present in lawn fertilisers can boost growth at the wrong time of year, leading to weather damage, pest problems and potential lawn disease down the line.

When fertilising your lawn, it’s also vital not to over-fertilise. An overly-liberal spread can lead to a number of issues, ranging from pest problems to grass discolouration (a.k.a. fertiliser burn).

Feeding your lawn in the summer

During bouts of hot weather, grass can become stressed as a result of the heat. Fertilising your lawn during these periods can be costly as the dry conditions can make grass more susceptible to fertiliser damage.

If you must feed your lawn during these periods, wait until there has been a spell of rainfall and let the grass soak up the moisture before you try feeding your lawn again. If the weather allows, you can feed your lawn at intervals of 6-8 weeks over the summer months, but beware of the aforementioned nitrogen issues.

How to feed a lawn

Other spring/summer lawn feeding tips

If you have treated your lawn for moss, weeds or dead grass, you may want to over-seed the affected areas. Fork the area and rake before sowing the grass seed and watering accordingly.

Over-seeding can be tricky at times, particularly when it comes to matching the colour of the rest of your lawn. If the new patch does produce a different shade of green to the rest of your garden, you may want to over-seed the entire lawn to ensure consistency.

To maintain healthy moisture throughout the summertime (and other periods of sustained dry weather), watering once a week in the early morning can be a great way to ensure your grass keeps a healthy colour and doesn’t dry out.

If wet weather is commonplace, avoid further watering to prevent your garden from becoming waterlogged and incurring water damage. This is particularly important for newly-laid lawns as it can result in shallow rooting.

Feeding your lawn in the autumn

Feeding your lawn during the autumn months with the relevant autumn feed can help prepare your garden for the impending cold weather. Winter is coming and your garden could use some protection.

Specialist autumn fertiliser or year-round lawn feed can give your grass a real kick in the...roots, preventing moss growth as well as strengthening it in preparation for the wet and frosty conditions to come.

For more expert garden tips, check out our Lawn Care Advice pages. Alternatively, why not arrange a FREE lawn survey and let us cater for your lawn with a feast to remember?

Request a FREE Lawn Survey

Transcript: Lawn Maintenance Schedule

The best way to keep your lawn looking gorgeous all year round is to follow a lawn care schedule. We created this lawn maintenance schedule with help from our specialist lawn care team. Feel free to share it with your friends or print it off and stick it on your fridge!

Spring – February to May

  • Mow

Mow your grass periodically throughout spring to stop it growing wild!

  • Overseed

Plant more seeds than usual to improve the thickness of your lawn.

  • Top Dress

Add soul mixes to the surface of your lawn to improve soil quality.

  • Aerate

Puncture the soil to alleviate drainage issues, reduce compaction & improve filtration of nutrients.

  • Deal with Pests

Pests are most prevalent this time of year, avoid infestation by eradicating them early.

  • Scarify

Remove moss and thatch from your lawn.

  • Treat Weeds

Apply herbicides to prevent your weeds from growing.

Need some assistance with your spring lawn care? Contact us now!

 

Summer – May to August

  • Mow

Mow your lawn throughout summer, it will still be growing rapidly!

  • Water

If summer is particularly hot, keep your lawn hydrated with a good amount of water twice per week.

  • Deal with Pests

Ants often build their nests in summer. Sweep them away or pour hot soapy water over the area.

Is your lawn not looking as healthy as it should this summer? We can help.

 

Autumn – August to November

  • Mow

Mow your grass in Autumn, it may be the last proper dry spell until spring!

  • Overseed

Plant more seeds than usual to improve the thickness of your lawn.

  • Aerate

We often experience rain in autumn, aerate your lawn to ventilate it and stop compaction.

  • Moss Control

Moss thrives in damp conditions, be sure to treat & remove it before it spreads.

  • Disease Protection

Diseases also thrive in damp (sometimes warm) autumn months. Check for fungus or unusual dry/yellow patches. Speak to a professional to treat your grass diseases properly.

Contact us if you need any help keeping your lawn healthy this Autumn!

 

Winter – November to February

  • Clear

As the leaves fall from the trees, they can smother your lawn. Use a rake to clear them away.

  • Aerate

Puncture the soil if you notice there is water is building up on the surface of your lawn.

  • Fertilize

Use a specially formulated winter lawn feed to keep your lawn healthy in the harsh conditions.

If your lawn is suffering this winter, speak to our specialists!

For more lawn care advice, click here:

Lawn Care Advice >

A nightmare scenario for lawn lovers nationwide, the sight of brown, patchy grass can leave an instant eye-sore and insight an immediate pain in the butt.

Brown patches in your garden are a tell-tale sign of dead or dying grass. Light a candle, sing a hymn and hold a minute silence – it’s as good as done for.

Or is it?

Pull on your scrubs, grab a de-fib and prepare to play Garden God as we discover just how to revive a dead lawn.

how to fix dead grass in summer

Reasons for dying grass

If deprived of water for a prolonged period of time, grass can naturally become dormant. Worse still, this can happen in as little as two to three weeks.

Luckily, one of the few upsides of British weather is that we very rarely have a spell of sun long enough to permanently put our lawns to bed and the risk of a light nap is probably the worst you can expect.

However, it’s not just water that can turn your garden into a barren wasteland. There are many reasons for dying grass, ranging from poor maintenance to Mother Nature.

Discovering which one led to your garden’s demise is vital in knowing how to treat it – so be prepared to play the role of Shrubbery Sherlock.

 

Drought

Perhaps the most common reason for dying grass, aforementioned demon drought can quickly turn a sunny spell into a death knell for your lawn. Like humans and animals, lack of water can take its toll and the plant world is no different.

Mowing

While it can theoretically prolong the period between cuts, mowing your lawn too short can cause untold damage to the grass – which could leave to a very long period between cuts indeed. If your lawn is left looking brown and bare, it’s likely you’ve been a bit too liberal with the blades.

Watering

It’s recommended that your lawn receive a good coverage of water once a week. Naturally, the weather conditions will dictate whether it needs more or less, but this is a good rule of thumb to go by. Over-watering or under-watering could lead your lawn to an untimely demise.

Insects

Pests can drain the life out of a lawn in no time, so it’s important to keep them at bay. Infested lawns surfaces peel back easily like a carpet so give the area the tug test if you suspect an infestation.

Fungus

Patchy brown areas can also be a giveaway of fungus damage on your lawn. Worse still, falling foul of fungus can quickly kill off your lawn, turning your green garden into a beige bomb site.

Pets

Do you or your neighbours own pets? If you/they do, your four-legged friends could well be the culprits for your fawny lawn. Nitrogen present in dog and cat urine can be lethal for your lawn, so be sure to keep tabs on Tiddles and a keen eye on Fido.

how to fix dead grass in summer

Reviving a dead lawn

Okay, so you’ve got to the bottom of your grassy grief – now what?

Luckily, there are a few sure-fire ways to cure your summertime sadness. It’s not unusual for Britain to endure a prolonged spell of sun out of the blue, so be sure to keep an eye on your grass during a lengthy summer heatwave.

Lack of water is the most common problem associated with dead lawns, particularly in the summer months. If you’re wondering how to fix dead grass in summer, the watering can should be your first port of call.

Even if this isn’t the main reason for your garden’s demise, watering is a great way to ensure your grass stays healthy in the future. In short, keeping your garden moist with regular watering is definitely a wise move.

Better still, thorough watering can prevent and cure damage done by dog/cat urine. Watering in the morning time is highly advisable as this can also help reduce the risk of fungus as well.

Speaking of fungus, this can be caused by a build-up of thatch so be sure to remove dethatch areas affected. Liberal use of fungicide will kill any persistent cases.

Finally, keep pests at bay by not over fertilising your lawn. Like fungus, use of pesticides can rid your lawn of these turf dwelling menaces once and for all.

 

Tips for a reviving a lawn

Overall, there are a few steps that you can take to help drag your lawn from the jaws of defeat. Stick by these and you won’t go far wrong:

  • Water weekly in the morning time
  • Don’t over-water or over-fertilise
  • Trim regularly but don’t scalp
  • Use fungicides and pesticides if necessary

 

If you’re still unsure how to rescue your lawn from dying a slow and browny death, give us a call on 0800 111 4958. Alternatively, why not let us take a look? Click below and book a FREE garden survey now!

Request a FREE Survey

While turf lawns will be more expensive than a naturally-grown seed lawn, the instant transformation can be worth every penny. For the impatient gardener, there’s no contest – it’s lawn over seed every time.

Revamping your garden can be an exciting prospect, so let’s not waste any time mucking around in the dirt! Grab a set of gardening gloves, dust off your finest fork and let’s jump straight in with this guide on laying garden turf.

 best time to lay turf

When to lay turf

If you’re looking to tune up your garden with the greeny goodness of garden turf, knowing when to do it can be a hugely important factor. Laying too early or too late could be setting yourself up for an almighty fall and mistiming your lay-day could see your freshly-laid lawn go downhill fast.

While the exact timing can vary from one expert to the next, the best time to lay turf is typically considered to be early to mid-autumn. The BBC says early; RHS says mid – we’ll let you decide who’s the authority on that one…

Autumn in the UK is typically considered to be between late September and late December, so – according to the timeline given by BBC/RHS – any time within the month of October would fit the bill perfectly. During this period, the grass will be able to root into the soil more easily, providing a secure foundation for your budding lawn.

 

How to lay turf

For the best advice on turf laying, a key lesson can be learnt from nu-metal icons, Limp Bizkit. While their gardening credentials may be a tad suspect at best, there’s no arguing that their song “Rollin’” is loaded with lawn laying tips.

Simple, yet effective, the chorus of “Keep rollin' rollin' rollin' rollin'” should be the anthem of turf layers worldwide. It seems the Limp Bizkit lads could have had a lucrative career in turf laying if the whole music thing didn’t pan out. And, if gigs ever dry up, who’s to say they still won’t?

However, there’s actually a lot more to laying turf than simply rollin’, rollin’, rollin’, rollin’. It’s a good idea to prep your soil beforehand, skimming off any old grass and removing any stones, weeds and lumps.

Fill in any holes and fork over to ensure a level surface, taking extra time to rake for a fine finish. To further bolster your new lawn's chances, add a layer of fertiliser across the surface and water for good measure.

 

best time to lay turf

 

Tips for laying turf

Now that the soil is primed and ready for a new coat of colour, it’s time to get your hands dirty and layer up. To ensure uniform coverage, it’s wise to lay your first roll of turf along a straight edge.

When rolling, try not to be too hasty in your approach. Slow and steady is the name of the game; slowly unravelling your turf will help you avoid damaging it.

Once your first roll is down, lay your second strip tight and up-close to the last. Continue this trend until the whole area is covered.

When rolling your turf, it’s also a good idea to let the turf run over the edge of your lawn area and trim to fit, rather than pre-cut to fit the space. Adding soil beneath the cut edges will prevent it from drying out.

You can ensure your turf has made a healthy connection with the ground beneath by firmly pressing down on the surface. Ideally, this can be done with a garden roller; however, it can also be easily accomplished with a tamper or the reverse side of a rake.

 

Maintaining your turf

Once your turf has been laid, now is the perfect time to sit back, relax and take in the satisfaction of a job well done. If you could then continue to do so for several weeks, that would be great, as freshly laid turf can take weeks to fully root. Avoid walking on your new lawn during this time as much as possible.

If you need to trim your new lawn over the wintertime (once the grass reaches around the 5cm mark), be sure to keep your mower blades set to high. Immediately balding your new lawn would be like giving yourself a buzzcut after getting a hair transplant and defeat the object of the whole thing.

 

Professional turf laying

While the above tips can be handy for anyone dead set on laying their own turf, it’s worth remembering that turf laying isn’t quite as easy as it sounds. Laying down turf yourself may save money short term but could cost you big time in the long run.

If you really want to give your garden the TLC it deserves, why not consider getting your turf laid professionally? At Lawn & Weed Expert, we provide a high-quality turf laying service that will bring out the best in your garden and ensure you get the perfect finish.

For more information on lawncare, maintenance and treatment, drop us a line on 0800 111 4958.

Alternatively, if you’re considering having your lawn laid professionally, get in touch today using the link below for a FREE lawn survey!

Request a FREE Lawn Survey

From seasonal lawn treatments to weed control and pest management, we provide a lot of different services here at Lawn & Weed Expert. When you get down to it, though, our ultimate goal is always more or less the same: to make our customers' gardens greener, healthier and lovelier to look at!

If you want an example of the results we can achieve, just take a look at this 'before and after' photo of one of our most recent jobs:

Lawn Treatment Before and After

What a difference, eh? That transformation is the result of our specialist lawn treatment service, which is available in Cardiff, Newport, Swansea, and most other locations in South Wales.

While the specifics change depending on the time of year (e.g. specialist fertiliser in early spring, or heavy moss control if winter's on its way), our service almost always begins with a free lawn survey. This initial visit allows us to assess the current condition of your lawn and identify what it will take to turn your dull brown grass into a lush green delight.

If your lawn needs some TLC, please don't hesitate to contact the Lawn & Weed Expert team today!

Request a Free Lawn Survey >

If you've spent the time laying new turf or spreading grass seed to try and improve the look of your lawn, then it's important you feed it properly to see the best results. Applying the wrong kind of fertiliser to your lawn can actually do it more harm than good, so don't go spreading any old fertiliser! Keep reading this blog to find out how and when you should fertilise your new lawn, or, get in touch with Lawn & Weed Expert and we'll select and apply the right kind of fertiliser to your lawn, so you don't have to worry about it!

High-Quality Soil:

One thing to bear in mind while deciding whether or not to fertilise your new lawn is the composition of the soil it's laid on/growing in. If you planted grass seed or laid turf over soil that is rich in organic material & nutrients, you may not have to fertilise your new lawn until it has had a couple of months to grow.

Similarly, if you applied a pre-turf fertiliser between the existing soil and your new turf, this should keep the new lawn fed while it establishes - requiring only regular watering to keep it happy! Once your new lawn has had plenty of time to establish & is starting to look green and luscious, it's wise to apply a slow release fertiliser that will help the lawn matures.

Poor-Quality Soil:

If the soil that you're laying turf or planting grass seed on is of poorer quality, you might want to apply a fertiliser that is rich in nutrients, often referred to as a 'starter fertiliser'. The type of fertiliser you should look for in this case is one that is rich in phosphorous and potassium. These minerals will promote root growth & robust grass blades, which is perfect for a new lawn.

Fertilisers that contain lots of nitrogen promote quick growth, but can actually put too much stress on young lawns and can stimulate the growth of weeds! 

Unsure About the Quality of Your Soil?

Don't worry, we aren't all experts when it comes to soil composition. The best thing to do if you're unsure what fertiliser your new lawn needs is to get a free lawn survey from the lawn care specialists here at Lawn & Weed Expert, or head to our lawn fertilisation page to read more.

Request a FREE Lawn Survey >

If you have any further questions about fertilising your new lawn, don't hesitate to give us a call on 0800 111 4958 and a member of our team will be happy to help you! 

 

 

 

Laying a lawn is not your average gardening task, and to do it correctly takes careful planning, preparation and patience. If you are interested in laying a lawn in your garden, why not contact the professionals? Here at Lawn & Weed Expert, we can supply and lay your new lawn stress-free! Simply enquire about our garden turf laying service.

Before you start:

Timing. Choosing to lay your turf at the right time of year makes a huge difference to the finished lawn. While springtime seems like an appealing time to lay your lawn, it might struggle during the summer months if it hasn't established properly (especially if we encounter another hosepipe ban). Ideally, your new lawn should be laid on warm, wet soil at a time when it isn't likely to dry out. Therefore, the best time of year to lay your lawn is in early autumn.

When your new turf arrives:

When your new turf arrives, you should think carefully about where you intend to store it. The best places to keep your turf until you lay it, is in a shaded area of the garden, somewhere where the turf isn't in direct sunlight & will remain relatively damp. Ideally, you want to try and lay your lawn within 1-2 days of delivery. If you need longer, make sure the rolls of turf are watered to keep them healthy in the meantime!

Laying the lawn:

Now comes the trickier part, actually laying the lawn. There's a lot to be said for well-prepared soil, get your preparation right and your new lawn should establish quickly with very few problems! 

  1. Start by skimming off any old grass, removing debris and weeding the existing patch of land. 
  2. Level out the land by filling and dips with soil and flatten and pronounced lumps and bumps.
  3. Using a rake, spread some fertilizer over the surface of the soil and water the soil well using a hosepipe.
  4. Starting at the edges, lay your first piece of turf. Unroll the turf gently & complete the first 'row'.
  5. Lay your second row next to the first, ensuring the seams of the turf are completely flush and compacted together.
  6. Repeat until the entire lawn is complete & trim any excess using a sharp cutting tool.

Initial lawn care:

Once your turf is laid, the hardest part of this job is over. Now, you just need to keep your lawn happy while it establishes its roots. Soak the lawn with water regularly, it's better to apply lots of water to the lawn less frequently to help the roots establish deeper in the soil rather than near to the surface.

Note: It's best to avoid walking on your lawn until it has had a chance to establish, this could take several weeks!

Would you like to leave your lawn installation to Lawn & Weed Expert? We have years of experience in laying turf and will get the job done quickly and efficiently! Simply click the button below and fill in our enquiry form and a member of our team will be in touch! 

Enquire about lawn laying > 

There aren’t many things as pleasing to a gardener’s eye than a beautifully balanced, level lawn that’s light, bright and lusciously green.

However, even a beautifully maintained lawn can become uneven over time. Sadly, unless you plan on switching to wooden decking or patio paving, that’s one thing you’ll have to get used to.

Bumpy lawns can be a real eye-sore for any garden, while also posing a potential risk to young children or elderly family.

Level the playing field and flatten your earthy opposition with these top tips for fixing a bumpy lawn.

 

how to fix a bumpy lawn,how to fix an uneven lawn

 

What causes a bumpy lawn?

Bumpy lawns are a common sight in gardens nationwide and aren’t so much of a possibility than they are an inevitability.

This could be down to a variety of reasons: be it weeds, wildlife or simply the weather. Meanwhile, children or pets can also have an effect on the lay of your land when they dig into the surface of your lawn.

While some of these elements are virtually impossible to avoid, there are a few handy ways to fix these bumpy blemishes when they do eventually occur.

 

Rolling in the deep?

While it may be tempting to simply flatten your turf with a heavy lawn roller, this option is often unsuccessful when it comes to uneven garden surfaces.

If anything, more often than not, this option only damages your lawn further by compacting the soil beneath, which can have a lasting negative effect on the grass.

Uneven lawn surfaces are often the result of dips and dents, making rolling a non-factor. Instead, try to do a bit of detective work beforehand and see just what is causing your lawn to take a slump.

 

How to fix an uneven lawn

Before you can fix your bumpy lawn, it’s important to know what’s causing the issue to begin with. While this can be difficult to ascertain for issues involving weather and wildlife, man-made problems can be easier to identify and may involve a different course of action.

 

The root of the problem

When diagnosing exactly what is causing your once-level lawn to take a dip, there are a couple of tell-tale signs that can point to the main culprit.

Uneven ground can be the result of poor drainage. If the lumps occur in areas around water pipes, it may be an issue relating to damaged water pipes.

Drainage problems such as this could require additional groundwork, so it’s worth seeking the advice of a professional if you do suspect you have a water issue in your garden.

 

Levelling shallow spots

If water damage isn’t the cause of your problems, you may be able to solve the issue yourself with a bit of garden DIY. When looking to fix a low spot in your garden, topdressing these dents is a great way to level your lawn in the least invasive way possible.

Combining compost, topsoil and sand, simply apply this muddy cocktail to the low patches, being careful not to smother the grass underneath with too much coverage. Use about half an inch of the mixture and rake to achieve an even spread. Brush the mixture through to ensure a thorough coverage of topdressing between the blades of grass in the affected area.

Over time, the earthy mixture should begin to blend in with the rest of the grass. If not, repeat the previous steps until the whole area is level and green. If there are spots of bare soil, over-seed to ensure an even coverage of grass.

 

Levelling deeper spots

The topdressing method of half an inch deep at a time can be a good solution for shallow dents but a time-consuming process for any dips of notable depth. For these problem patches, you can simply pad out the area beneath the surface.

This can be done by removing the surface turf (aka, “sod”) intact and filling the dented area below with topsoil, adding water to the topsoil as you go to remove air pockets. Once you have added enough dirt to level the ground, simply replace the turf, water the grass and let nature take its course!

If your problem area is larger than one square foot, it may be worth removing the turf in smaller chunks. Anything bigger than one foot can be difficult to replace in one piece, making it a real awkward sod indeed.

 

Levelling multiple problem areas

If your lawn is overrun by more craters and dents than a Spartan’s shield, you may need to consider a more extensive solution and potentially entertain the idea of a wholesale refurb of the lawn.

Re-grading your lawn can be a somewhat drastic option to take, but it can also be an extremely effective tactic in the long run – particularly if you are inundated with dips and dents. Think of it as wiping the slate clean and starting from scratch, giving you an entirely new, fresh canvas to play with.

 

For a professional opinion, why not give us a call? Our team of experts can advise you with the best course of action and even provide you with a FREE lawn survey. Simply give us a call on 0800 111 4958 or contact us via the box below.

 

Get in touch today!

If you’re wondering how you can give your lawn a well-needed makeover, why not follow our lawn makeover plan! As experts in the lawn care industry, we can talk you through the steps you need to take to restore your lawn to its glory days.

In total, there are eight steps that we recommend you follow to transform your lawn from a sad, weed-riddled patch of land to a soft, green, healthy lawn. Of course, we’ll explain each step in more detail as we progress but, for your reference, the steps you need to take are:

  1. Assessing the Damage
  2. Removing Debris
  3. Aerating the Grass/Soil
  4. Removing Weeds
  5. Scarifying
  6. Seeding
  7. Feeding
  8. Watering

Assess the Damage

Every lawn is different and some lawns might need more care and attention than others. We recommend starting with a free lawn survey to assess the damage.

If your lawn is severely damaged (beyond repair), our specialists might advise you to have a completely fresh start and re-turf your lawn. However, if they feel that your existing lawn is salvageable, they will more than likely recommend that you give your lawn a good mow and then proceed with a lawn makeover plan that looks something like this…

Remove Debris

If your lawn has been unattended for a while, it’s likely that there is a build up of dead leaves, dirt and debris across its surface. Before you can begin treating your lawn, you need to remove all of this or it will smother the young grass shoots trying to emerge. This is a simple enough job, grab a rake and start raking the debris into a pile so that you can dispose of it in your garden bin.

Aerate the Grass/Soil

Over time, if lawns are walked on, the soil becomes incredibly compacted making it difficult for grass to grow. Compacted grass causes poorly-developed roots, weakens the grass and can even promote grass diseases, so aerating the lawn is an important step in its recovery.

Aeration creates tiny holes across the surface of your lawn, loosens the soil and promotes healthy growth. Aerating and entire lawn by hand can be a very time-consuming process. You have to push a garden fork roughly 10-15cm into the soil at 15cm intervals. So, if you have a big lawn, you’re going to be aerating for quite some time…

Our Aeration and spiking service will ensure your lawn is fully aerated and ready for the next stages of its makeover in a fraction of the time. We use professional aerating machines that will do all the work for you!

Remove Weeds

If you want your lawn to be a pristine, weed-free space, now is the time to remove all the weeds in sight! To do this by hand you’ll need to dig up each weed and apply a suitable weed killer to ensure they don’t come back.

When you do this yourself, you will not only spend hours clambering around your garden on your hands and knees, but you also run the risk of choosing and applying a weed killer that might inhibit the growth of your lawn further down the line. We recommend leaving this arduous task to the (Lawn & Weed) experts!

View our Weed Control Services >

Scarifying

Once all the of the obvious weeds are out of the way, it’s time to scarify! Scarification removes thatch and moss that’s become interwoven in your lawn.

To do this by hand, you will need to work with one small area of your lawn at a time using a wire rake. The thatch and moss might be quite matted and thick, so you will need to use some elbow grease to pull all of it out! Alternatively, you can hire our time of scarification experts who will scarify your lawn with a scarification machine.

(Bear in mind that your lawn might actually look worse after the scarification process, but in the long run, this will help your lawn flourish!)

Seeding

If your lawn has some sever bald patches or needs a little extra volume, now is the time to spread some seeds. For thin areas, spread the seeds and lightly rake over them to help press them into the soil. For particularly bald patches, break up the soil in the bald area, scatter the seeds over and cover with a thin layer of compost.

If you suspect that the brown/yellow, sparse patches on your lawn are suspicious and might need special treatment, this page might help you identify and treat the problem:

Brown/Yellow Lawn Patches >

Feeding

In order to give your new grass seeds the best start in life, you should apply fertilizer to your lawn. There are lots of different fertilizers on the market, and choosing the right one can sometimes be tricky.

If you’re unsure what type of fertilizer will work for your lawn, don’t panic. We offer a professional lawn fertilisation service, using fertilisers that are exclusive to industry professionals. Our experts will help you determine the right type of fertiliser for your lawn & apply it for you.

View our Lawn Fertilisation Service >

Watering

So, your lawn makeover is nearing completion! If you’ve followed all the steps in our lawn makeover guide, your lawn should be well on its way to looking green and healthy! The final step, watering your lawn, seems pretty self-explanatory, but there is definitely an art to it.  

We recommend watering your lawn 2-3 times per week rather than a little bit every day. This prevents the grassroots remaining near the surface of your lawn (where the water is). For more advice on watering your lawn, head to our watering tips page.

We hope that this lawn makeover guide helps you to improve your lawn, whatever state it’s currently in. Remember, if you have any questions, or if you’d like our help giving your lawn a makeover – get in touch. Call us on 0800 111 4958, or fill in our enquiry form.

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