In the UK, there are hundreds of different garden pests. Controlling the spread of these pests before they damage your garden can be challenging, but it's not impossible. Knowing what pests to expect is the first step towards a pest-free garden. Here are some of the most common types of lawn pests to look out for while you're carrying out your garden maintenance. 

 Ants

Ants (Common Black Ants)

Ants are a common garden pest here in the UK. They have a habit of building their nests in your lawn and spreading into your home and around your garden in their hunt for food.

Worker ants work tirelessly to expand the nest and grow the colony resulting in large nests with intricate and extensive tunnel connections.

Ants can create mounds of soil, raised spots in your lawn and can promote weed & moss growth, that's why it's best to get them under control quickly.

Ant Control Services >

 

Moles

 Moles

Moles are garden pests that live underneath your lawn. They don't eat the roots of your lawn, but they do cause serious structural damage underground. They're 

Their tunnel systems can cause damage to your garden while creating spaces for mice and rats to invade your garden too. Keep your eye out for large mounds of dirt on your lawn, this is a tell-tale sign that you're dealing with a mole problem.

Note: a mole problem might also signify that you have an infestation of grubs too! Learn more about our grub control services here.

Mole Control Services > 

 

 Leatherjackets

Leatherjackets (Crane Fly Larvae)

Leatherjackets are a common type of garden pest that's most prevalent during autumn. The hungry larvae will have no problem devouring large swathes of your lawn - stripping entire lawns and killing grassroots if left untreated. 

Leatherjackets are a tasty snack for birds who will further damage your lawn in an attempt to find and eat them. Keep your eyes peeled for grubs that are grey in colour, have no legs and have mandibles at one end of their body.

Seek treatment immediately if you think you've got an infestation of leatherjackets in your garden.

Leatherjacket Control Services >

 

Chafer grubs

 Chafer Grubs (Chafer Beetle Larvae)

Chafer grubs are a common lawn pest that lives in the soil and feeds on both living and decaying plant material. Much like leatherjackets, chafer grubs will eat through huge areas of your lawn causing severe damage. 

Birds also love to eat these plump bugs, meaning you're likely to have a problem with birds pecking at your lawn alongside the chafer grub infestation. 

Chafer grubs prefer sandy soils and travel deeper into the soil when temperatures drop. You should keep an eye out for them during warmer periods when they rise nearer the surface of your lawn to feed. 

Chafer Grub Control Treatment >

 Aphids

 Aphids

Aphids are small insects that feed on the sap of plants in your garden. With over 500 different aphid species living in the UK, they are considered one of the most common garden pests we have to contend with. 

While aphids physically damage crops when they're gorging on the sap, they're most dangerous because they're common vectors of plant viruses.

Their huge numbers mean they can quickly spread a virus between different parts of a single plant, amongst other plants in your garden and beyond into neighbouring gardens. It's best to get them under control as soon as possible.

Request a FREE Lawn Survey >

  If you're currently experiencing a problem with common garden pests, get in touch with the Lawn and Weed Expert team! We offer free lawn surveys to determine the best course of action for your garden pest infestation and will provide effective treatments where we can to help you get your pest problem under control. Learn more about our garden pest control services below.

Garden Pest Control Services >

Waterlogged Lawn

If there’s one thing that us Brits know what to deal with, it’s rain, rain and more rain.

Unfortunately for us, we are more than used to our fair share of the wet stuff, so have become accustomed to working and living through it, especially our lawns. This often results in puddles and damp patches, known as waterlogging, that prevent us from taking part in our favourite garden past times, sports or simply enjoying the outdoors.

 

What causes a waterlogged lawn?

Waterlogged lawns occur when water builds up as a result of excessive rain and is unable to drain away or dry up, which can present a number of problems. Firstly, the presence of water itself can inhibit the supply of oxygen to the grassroots, which in turn can impact the health of the lawn. Second, waterlogged lawns can prevent carbon dioxide in the air from diffusing. The functionality of the grassroots is decreased or halted completely as they start to diminish, which allows the invasion of rot and decay organisms to take place. Thirdly, essential nutrients found within the lawn can be leached out which results in hungry, deprived soil as well as serious compaction. The lawn itself can also thin out, creating an environment where thatch and moss will pitch-in to the new gaps and thrive in the damper conditions.

 

Preventing a waterlogged lawn

To prevent your lawn from becoming waterlogged in the event of a severe downpour, there are a number of steps that you can take. The main method of prevention, however, is to regularly aerate your lawn. This allows plenty of drainages and air to reach deep into the soil. The best form of aeration for this type of work is known as ‘hollow tine aeration’ as this creates optimum airflow and drainage to the lower levels of soil. Once the lawn has been aerated, you can then re-seed to allow seeds the opportunity to germinate and create a thicker, more complex root system.

It’s important to observe your lawn during patches of rain in order to identify problem areas. These may occur as a result of uneven patches where the water has nowhere to drain. To counter this, be sure to level out uneven patches and aerate to prevent waterlogging from happening.

 

Dealing with a waterlogged lawn

  • Short-term solutions – If your waterlogged lawn was caused by flooding, the first things you can do to rectify it is to wash down hard surfaces and pick up debris to prevent drains from being blocked, allowing a steady flow of water to remove pollutants. Try to avoid stepping on the soil, as doing so will compact the lawn and make the conditions worse. Remove any damaged shoots from affected grass plants. If the waterlogging has occurred during the spring, you can apply a balanced fertiliser to improve growth.
  • Long-term solutions – If you have serious waterlogged lawns, we suggest you try to improve the soil structure and drainage system. The most popular drainage systems are known as land drains and French drains. Both of these consist of a trench or series of trenches that are dug into the lawn and lined with a porous film. The trench is then filled with graded stone before being topped off with topsoil so that the relaid turf on the surface returns to being level and even with the rest of the lawn.

The difference between the two types of drains is that a land drain also has a pipe which is often perforated, attached along its length to transport excess water away faster and more efficiently. In both cases, the trenches are dug at a shallow angle in order for the water to flow along the trench by gravity to a strategically-placed soakaway. From here, it is guided to disperse harmlessly underground. The purpose of the porous film is to filter out silt from any water that is washed into the trench. If this filtration didn’t exist, both types of drains can easily become clogged with silt and become overwhelmed with the water they aim to funnel away.

 

Are you experiencing a waterlogged lawn? Do you require professional help to even out or aerate your lawn? Be sure to get in touch with the expert lawn care team here at Lawn & Weed Expert today by filling out our lawn survey!

Submit a Lawn Survey >

If you want to add a touch of sparkle to your garden, why not consider adding some creative lawn edging? Don't let that extra space around the perimeter of your garden go to waste, there are so many different ways you can utilise it and get creative. We've come up with a selection of lawn edging ideas to spark your imagination. 

Natural Rocks

To give your garden a rustic feel, you could add a selection of natural rocks as edging around your lawn. Whether you choose large natural stone blocks or smaller pebbles to create your border you can rest assured that your new lawn border will look great against the soft green grass of your lawn.

You can find large pieces of natural stone from a local building supplier, and bags of pebbles in your local hardware store. Use a contrasting coloured mulch underneath the stones for a striking look. 

Wooden Sleepers

If you want to create a bold statement in your garden, why not upcycle some planks of wood to create your lawn edging? Creating straight lines in natural materials like wood draw the eye without distracting from the beauty of your garden. Some people find wood is a far more aesthetically pleasing option when compared to manmade materials like concrete or bricks can contrast with your lawn in a way that's not always appealing.

When choosing wood for your garden edging, we recommend Redwood and Cedar because they won't rot over time. However, you could use large wooden logs, pallets or any spare wood that you like.

Flower Beds

A simple flower bed with an array of your favourite flowers can really bring your lawn edging to life. Create a simple border around the perimeter of your lawn, fill the edging with soil and mulch and plant flowers and plants to your heart's content. During the spring and summer months, this multicoloured lawn edging spectacle will fill your garden with a wonderful floral aroma and will look wonderful against your luscious green grass. 

Adding lovely lawn edging is all well and good, but if your lawn is not looking its best, your efforts will be for nothing! To keep your lawn looking its best, get in touch with the Lawn and Weed Expert team.

bird on plant

Did you know that the types of plants and flowers that are planted in your garden can have an effect on the wildlife that you find coming and going? Well, they can!

By choosing the right plants, you can provide both food and shelter for certain wildlife, especially birds. So, if you’d like your garden to be a nature hotspot, try adding these plants to attract different species of birds.

More...

Eco-Friendly Lawn

With the new year and new decade upon us, many homeowners are taking the time to reflect on their lifestyles and make some positive changes - both for themselves and for the environment.

There's been much talk of climate change and humanity's impact on the environment in recent years (thanks in no small part to young activists like Greta Thunberg) so it should come as no surprise that more and more people are choosing to go green. Lately, we're seeing loads solar panels on roofs, electric cars on the road, and smart meters being used to measure energy usage - in all these ways and more besides, we're paying increasingly close attention to how our actions affect the world around us.

But did you know that the way you treat your lawn can also have an impact on the environment! No? Well, it can. Here are five tips that you can follow for a more eco-friendly lawn:

  1. Rainwater Irrigation – The next time you water your lawn, consider the ways in which you can conserve water. Now, we’re not talking about stopping watering your lawn completely or reducing the amount of time you spend watering your lawn, but maybe using rainwater instead. Since the UK has more than enough rainfall throughout the year, it’s more than likely that your lawn gets its fair share of watering, but throughout the summer when we do go through weeks (and sometimes months) of dry spells, it can be extremely useful to use rainwater to water your lawn rather than your property’s water system. You can gather rainwater and store it in drums for future use. All that is required is to catch the water as it flows out of your gutter downspouts and use an electric pump to create enough water pressure to power your very own irrigation system!

  1. Install a no-mow lawnMowing the lawn can sometimes be an arduous and time-consuming task, especially if the weather isn’t favourable. In this case, the last place you want to be is outside, with grass flying all over the place. So, how can you avoid this problem? Install a no-mow lawn! There are several grassalternatives that you can install that require no mowing at all, such as astroturf. Not only are you avoiding the actual task of mowing, you are also reducing the amount of energy that you use. Another great way that you can do this is by hardscaping. Instead of having grass, why not build a desert or rock scene? Hardscaping requires no maintenance at all, and your energy usage will decrease dramatically.

  1. Use eco-friendly lawn care equipment – To reduce their impact on the environment, many people choose to ditch their cars and walk (or maybe cycle). The same can be done with your lawn care equipment! You know that big, gas-guzzling lawn mower that you have stored away in the shed? Well, why not replace it with an electric one? You can find both corded and cordless lawn equipment at any home department retailer. Despite not performing as well as gas-powered tools, battery-powered tools are a great option due to their portability, and this is where you’ll make the most difference in your quest to create an eco-friendly lawn.

  1. Using biopesticides – Historically, insecticides have been used as a form of lawn insect control. However, research has shown that these have an adverse effect on the animals that come into contact with them e.g. causing reproductive ailments in birds such as thinner eggshells. An example of manmade chemical improving the quality of life for humans at the expense of the wider environment. A fantastic alternative that can be used are biopesticides, a chemical that is growing in popularity due to its controlling of insects rather than killing. Here, only targeted insects are affected with no adverse effects on other animals.

  1. Properly disposing of lawn waste – Disposing of garden waste correctly is another great way that you can help the environment with an eco-friendly lawn. Mulch and compost are garden wastes that have been organically broken down and recycled by Mother Nature, but you need to lend a helping hand in the process. The first and easiest thing that you can do is to mulch whilst you mow. This can be done by using a mulching blade on your mower. The second way you can help is by bagging clippings for disposal and the third is by composting. Composting recycles organic materials to be spread back into the earth for nutritional purposes.

 

And there you have it! Five great ways to make your lawn more eco-friendly. If you have any other queries or your lawn needs some professional care, please get in touch with the Lawn and Weed Expert team today.

Request a FREE lawn survey >

Contact Lawn and Weed Expert

Name *
E-mail address *
Location *
Telephone Number *
Your Message
 
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character
Enter Letters (No Spaces) *
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character