Lawn grubs that you find in your lawn are baby insects – also known as larvae. Lawn grubs cause problems because they burrow through your soil eating your precious grassroots and destroying your garden as they go.

The most common time to find lawn grubs in your garden is during the summer months. The adult insects emerge at the start of summer to mate and then deposit their eggs back into the soil. Their eggs take a couple of weeks to hatch and once they do, they start feeding… on your lawn!

There are two types of common lawn grubs that you might come across in your garden; chafer grubs and leatherjackets. Here at Lawn & Weed Expert, we can help you eradicate both types of lawn grub and prevent damage. But first, let us tell you a bit about them.

Chafer Grubs

lawn grubs

Lawn grubs in your garden

If you’re unfortunate enough to have an infestation of chafer grubs in your garden, it can be truly devastating for your lawn and other garden plants. It can be quite difficult to detect lawn grubs because they live and feed underground and barely come to the surface.

If you do happen to spot lawn grubs in your garden, we recommend contacting us for a free lawn survey so we can assess the extent of the infestation and start to treat it before these pesky lawn grubs cause you too many problems!

Identifying a chafer grub:

If you see any lawn grubs in your garden with the following characteristics, then it’s likely that you have a chafer grub infestation.

  • 3 pairs of legs situated at the front of the body
  • A distinctive light brown/orange coloured head
  • Plump white body

Chafer grubs, like most lawn grubs, are eaten by foxes, badgers and a variety of birds including magpies and jackdaws. If you see any of these animals lingering suspiciously on your lawn and looking for food, it might be time to give us a call! For more information on our lawn grub control services, click the button below:

Chafer Grub Control Service >

 Leatherjackets

lawn grubs

Leatherjackets are baby crane flies – or crane fly larvae. You might be thinking, what’s a crane fly? Crane flies are much more commonly known by their nickname – Daddy Longlegs. During late autumn and early spring, these lawn grubs will feed ravenously on grass and plant roots, creating large patches of dry yellow grass as your lawn starts to die.

If you start to see these appearing, contact us for a free lawn survey to assess whether lawn grubs are causing the problem.

Identifying a leatherjacket:

If you spot a lawn grub with any of the following features, you might have a leatherjacket infestation in your garden.

  • No obvious legs
  • Brown/grey all over
  • Mandibles at one end

Leatherjackets are often eaten by crows and magpies. So, if you see any of these birds flocking to your lawn then you should investigate to see if you can spot any lawn grubs and give us a call. We offer a comprehensive leatherjacket control service that will help keep your lawn grub free! Find out more here:

Leatherjacket Control Service >

While lawn grubs like these can be a particular nuisance, we know they aren’t the only type of pest you might find on your lawn! For all of our lawn pest & insect control services, simply click the button here: Lawn Pest & Insect Control Services >

watering lawn at night

 

21st century life is a busy one for most working men and women in the UK. Balancing jobs, homelife and general admin on the go can be a full-time juggling act with little reprieve. Even retirees can have their hands full with family, health and hobbies all working their way into the daily diary.

If you happen to be feeling the pressure of a busy schedule, it’s all to easy to let some tasks slip by the wayside and watering the lawn is often one of them. While this may seem like a job that’s low down on the totem pole, for garden enthusiasts, it can be vitally important, particularly if you want to maintain your grass.

However, that doesn’t mean you should squeeze this task in when you can. There’s a time and place for everything and watering your grass at night could land you in hot water.

 

Is watering your lawn at night a good idea?

 

Okay, let’s wade through the weeds and jump right in at the deep end: should you water your lawn at night?

Simply put – no. When it comes to lawncare, watering at night can lead to a variety of unsightly issues and leave your luscious lawn looking notably under the weather.

As a rule of thumb, the later you leave it, the worse it is for your garden. Watering your lawn in the evening can promote mildew and fungus growth, while it can also attract pests as well.

Water can cling to blades of grass overnight which can, in turn, lead to lawn diseases and transform your prized plot into a patchy eyesore.

 

When is the best time to water your lawn?

 

During the spring and summer months when rainfall is theoretically less frequent (theoretically, at least), your lawn may require a little more TLC to keep it at peak performance – particularly when it comes to moisture.

The best time to water your lawn is typically in the morning. While the exact timing can vary from one expert to the next, before sunrise is generally considered ideal but anytime between 4:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. is also deemed acceptable.

 

Why should I water my lawn in the morning?

 

During the 4-10 window in the morning, the air is typically cooler than later on in the day when water can evaporate a lot faster. Meanwhile, the wind is also usually lighter, allowing the water droplets to remain where they are rather than blow away.

If watering your lawn in the a.m. is out of the question and an evening splash is simply unavoidable, its recommended that you water your lawn no later than 6:00 p.m. (ideally before). This gives your lawn a little time to soak up the moisture and dry before nightfall.

 

For more information on keeping your lawn green and healthy, drop us a line today on 0800 111 4958.

Alternatively, use the button below to request a free lawn survey and keep your garden in peak condition!

Get a FREE lawn survey!

Keep your grass green - and make your neighbours green with envy - with this handy guide on when to scarify your lawn.

Scarify your lawn

What is lawn scarifying?

Okay, first things first, just what exactly does “scarification” mean? While it may, at first glance, seem like something you would associate with horror movies, the real definition is luckily far less sinister.

Scarifying a lawn – also known as de-thatching – is essentially the process of removing thatch and moss from a garden surface (hence the aptly named alias). The word “scarify” is actually pronounced “skah-rify” – as opposed to “scare” (like Scary Movie) or “scar” (a la Scarface).

But how do you scarify a lawn? Well, say hello to my little friend…the scarifier!

While that name could also very easily pass as a horror movie title, the scarifier is anything but horrifying. This handy tool uses rolling blades to trim and remove thatch, moss and debris, keeping your lawn looking lush and healthy.

Scarifiers typically come in two forms: manually operated and machine powered. Machine scarifiers come with either an electrical or petrol-powered motor and boast self-rotating blades. Meanwhile, the manual version features simple, push/pull operated rollers on the end of a long handle – imagine the bigger, more talented brother of the humble rake and you won’t be far off.

Still not sure about what lawn scarifying is, or wondering it it's the right treatment for your lawn? Don't hesitate to reach out and contact our team here at Lawn & Weed Expert. Our highly-trained staff will talk you through the scarification process and explain it's benefits, and help you decide whether or not this is the right treatment for you and your lawn. We're always happy to help, so reach out today! 

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When to scarify lawn surfaces

If your lawn has begun to possess a yellowy tinge, it could be time to break out the scarifier. After all, nobody wants a lawn that looks ill and on its last legs.

That being said, there are certain times of the year that are more suitable than others. Late spring and early autumn are considered to be the two best times to scarify your lawn, capitalising on both the weather and the conditions of the ground.

Most garden experts agree that the ideal time to scarify your lawn is when your grass is growing strongly. If you scarify at the wrong time of year when your grass isn’t growing as fast, you risk damaging your lawn severely.

Dusting off the scarifier too early can ruin your lawn, so be patient and don’t jump the gun – that lawn isn’t going anywhere. Similarly, if you miss your window and are tempted to scarify in the wintertime, do so at your peril. You could leave your lawn exposed to the cold weather making it more difficult for your grass to recover.

It’s also advisable to scarify your grass when it’s had a little rain and isn’t too dry. A lawn that’s moderately moist underneath but dry to the touch is ideal, making for the perfect time to unleash your inner horticultural handyman.

Finally, remember that scarifying can be an extremely stressful process for your lawn, so try to time it to coincide with good weather conditions to follow. Chances are that the grass is still going to need a few days to recover, so try to make the aftermath as comfortable as possible.

Top tips for scarifying your lawn

While timing is everything when it comes to scarifying your garden, there are also a few handy hints and tips you can employ to help give your lawn a fighting chance of flourishing.

Mowing your lawn a week prior to scarifying can be a great way to prep your garden for its impending makeover. This will remove excess grass and dice up any thatch patches, making it easier to shift later on.

Similarly, you may also want to apply moss killer to your lawn a week or so before your scheduled scarify day. This will ensure the moss is dead and prevent it from spreading any further during the scarifying process.

For the best results, it’s also a good idea to water your grass a couple of days before scarifying, if the weather is fine. Alternatively, you could just hold off scarifying your lawn until a day or two after a bout of rainfall and save yourself a job.

Whatever you do, don’t scarify when it’s wet – you could end up yanking out the grass by the root, removing the grass itself as well as the thatch. If your lawn does seem a little bare post-scarification, you may want to scatter some additional grass seed. This can help create a thicker, greener lawn, while also helping to limit weed growth.

Lastly, remember to be patient. You may find that scarifying your lawn leaves your garden looking worse than when you started. Don’t panic and have faith – if you’ve timed it right and followed these top tips, your garden will grow back looking healthy and better than ever.

It's important to trust the process, and know that your garden won't look perfect right away. If you want to see some before and after pictures of the scarification process, click the link below to see a blog with some amazing before and after photos of the scarification process. 

Before and After Scarification

 

Want to get the most out of your garden? Request a free lawn survey from Lawn & Weed Expert!

We hope this blog has given you some useful information about lawn scarification and its benefits! If you think that lawn scarification is something that will benefit your lawn, Lawn & Weed Expert have got you covered. We offer a highly professional service from trained professionals. Click the link below to find out a little more about our professional scarification services and how they can improve the health of your lawn. 

Professional Scarification Service >

 

Read More: What's the Difference Between Scarifying, Raking, and Dethatching? 

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