If you’re wondering how you can give your lawn a well-needed makeover, why not follow our lawn makeover plan! As experts in the lawn care industry, we can talk you through the steps you need to take to restore your lawn to its glory days.

In total, there are eight steps that we recommend you follow to transform your lawn from a sad, weed-riddled patch of land to a soft, green, healthy lawn. Of course, we’ll explain each step in more detail as we progress but, for your reference, the steps you need to take are:

  1. Assessing the Damage
  2. Removing Debris
  3. Aerating the Grass/Soil
  4. Removing Weeds
  5. Scarifying
  6. Seeding
  7. Feeding
  8. Watering

Assess the Damage

Every lawn is different and some lawns might need more care and attention than others. We recommend starting with a free lawn survey to assess the damage.

If your lawn is severely damaged (beyond repair), our specialists might advise you to have a completely fresh start and re-turf your lawn. However, if they feel that your existing lawn is salvageable, they will more than likely recommend that you give your lawn a good mow and then proceed with a lawn makeover plan that looks something like this…

Remove Debris

If your lawn has been unattended for a while, it’s likely that there is a build up of dead leaves, dirt and debris across its surface. Before you can begin treating your lawn, you need to remove all of this or it will smother the young grass shoots trying to emerge. This is a simple enough job, grab a rake and start raking the debris into a pile so that you can dispose of it in your garden bin.

Aerate the Grass/Soil

Over time, if lawns are walked on, the soil becomes incredibly compacted making it difficult for grass to grow. Compacted grass causes poorly-developed roots, weakens the grass and can even promote grass diseases, so aerating the lawn is an important step in its recovery.

Aeration creates tiny holes across the surface of your lawn, loosens the soil and promotes healthy growth. Aerating and entire lawn by hand can be a very time-consuming process. You have to push a garden fork roughly 10-15cm into the soil at 15cm intervals. So, if you have a big lawn, you’re going to be aerating for quite some time…

Our aeration and spiking service will ensure your lawn is fully aerated and ready for the next stages of its makeover in a fraction of the time. We use professional aerating machines that will do all the work for you!

Remove Weeds

If you want your lawn to be a pristine, weed-free space, now is the time to remove all the weeds in sight! To do this by hand you’ll need to dig up each weed and apply a suitable weed killer to ensure they don’t come back.

When you do this yourself, you will not only spend hours clambering around your garden on your hands and knees, but you also run the risk of choosing and applying a weed killer that might inhibit the growth of your lawn further down the line. We recommend leaving this arduous task to the (Lawn & Weed) experts!

View our Weed Control Services >

Scarifying

Once all the of the obvious weeds are out of the way, it’s time to scarify! Scarification removes thatch and moss that’s become interwoven in your lawn.

To do this by hand, you will need to work with one small area of your lawn at a time using a wire rake. The thatch and moss might be quite matted and thick, so you will need to use some elbow grease to pull all of it out! Alternatively, you can hire our time of scarification experts who will scarify your lawn with a scarification machine.

(Bear in mind that your lawn might actually look worse after the scarification process, but in the long run, this will help your lawn flourish!)

Seeding

If your lawn has some sever bald patches or needs a little extra volume, now is the time to spread some seeds. For thin areas, spread the seeds and lightly rake over them to help press them into the soil. For particularly bald patches, break up the soil in the bald area, scatter the seeds over and cover with a thin layer of compost.

If you suspect that the brown/yellow, sparse patches on your lawn are suspicious and might need special treatment, this page might help you identify and treat the problem:

Brown/Yellow Lawn Patches >

Feeding

In order to give your new grass seeds the best start in life, you should apply fertilizer to your lawn. There are lots of different fertilizers on the market, and choosing the right one can sometimes be tricky.

If you’re unsure what type of fertilizer will work for your lawn, don’t panic. We offer a professional lawn fertilisation service, using fertilisers that are exclusive to industry professionals. Our experts will help you determine the right type of fertiliser for your lawn & apply it for you.

View our Lawn Fertilisation Service >

Watering

So, your lawn makeover is nearing completion! If you’ve followed all the steps in our lawn makeover guide, your lawn should be well on its way to looking green and healthy! The final step, watering your lawn, seems pretty self-explanatory, but there is definitely an art to it.  

We recommend watering your lawn 2-3 times per week rather than a little bit every day. This prevents the grassroots remaining near the surface of your lawn (where the water is). For more advice on watering your lawn, head to our watering tips page.

We hope that this lawn makeover guide helps you to improve your lawn, whatever state it’s currently in. Remember, if you have any questions, or if you’d like our help giving your lawn a makeover – get in touch.

Make an Enquiry >

pet playing with plant

For animal lovers, pets aren't just an interesting addition to the home, they can often become a cherished part of the family. As such, taking care of your pet can be just as important as looking after a loved one.

If you're a pet owner, it's important to know the dos and don'ts of animal care. From a gardening perspective, this includes knowing which plants are safe for pets and what ones pose a danger.

Luckily, our team and Lawn & Weed Expert are here to help. We've created a handy list to help you differentiate between the cat's meow and the dog's b...uh, the dog's bark, in our blog on plants that are safe for pets.

More...

Pet urine damages lawns

We all love our pets, but they can make it difficult to keep the garden lawn in tip-top condition. If you have a dog or a cat, you may well be familiar with the unsightly patches of brown grass that sometimes ensue when your pet urinates on the lawn.

What you may not know is why pet urine damages lawns.

Why does this happen?

Your pet's urine contains a lot of nitrogen, and too much nitrogen turns grass brown. The same thing happens if you use too much fertiliser on your lawn - the grass becomes 'burned' or 'scorched' due to the excess nitrogen.

The brown patches created by pet urine are very often surrounded by a so-called 'halo' of healthy-looking dark green grass. This is because there's a weaker concentration of nitrogen (and salts) at the outer perimeter of the urine patch, and somewhat ironically, this lower-level nitrogen boost actually improves the health of the surrounding grass. It's like a roaring fire: you don't want to be slap bang in the middle of it, but sitting nearby can be quite favourable!

Is it just urine from female animals that causes this problem?

It's been observed that female dogs (bitches) leave brown patches more frequently than their male counterparts, but this isn't anything to do with the chemical makeup of female dog urine. The reason why bitches are more likely to damage your lawn is actually very simple: female dogs tend to squat and urinate on a patch of grass, while male dogs - broadly speaking - prefer to cock a leg and use their urine to 'mark' a tree, bollard or similar object.

If you have a male dog that squats on your garden lawn to urinate, this is just as likely to cause damage as if he were female.

How can I keep my pet from damaging my lawn?

When trying to keep your garden free of unsightly brown patches, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Encourage your pets to relieve themselves somewhere other than the lawn, or - failing that - consider using a product like Dog Rocks to make their urine less harmful to your grass. Irrigating your lawn after your dog or cat urinates will also help by watering down the nitrogen and encouraging your grass to grow stronger.

If your lawn is already blighted by brown patches, the problem may not be irreversible. Contact Lawn & Weed Expert today to arrange a FREE lawn survey - we'll visit your property, assess the extent of the damage, and recommend the best course of action.

Book Your FREE Lawn Survey >   Other Causes of Brown Patches >

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Lawn grubs that you find in your lawn are baby insects – also known as larvae. Lawn grubs cause problems because they burrow through your soil eating your precious grassroots and destroying your garden as they go.

The most common time to find lawn grubs in your garden is during the summer months. The adult insects emerge at the start of summer to mate and then deposit their eggs back into the soil. Their eggs take a couple of weeks to hatch and once they do, they start feeding… on your lawn!

There are two types of common lawn grubs that you might come across in your garden; chafer grubs and leatherjackets. Here at Lawn & Weed Expert, we can help you eradicate both types of lawn grub and prevent damage. But first, let us tell you a bit about them.

Chafer Grubs

lawn grubs

Lawn grubs in your garden

If you’re unfortunate enough to have an infestation of chafer grubs in your garden, it can be truly devastating for your lawn and other garden plants. It can be quite difficult to detect lawn grubs because they live and feed underground and barely come to the surface.

If you do happen to spot lawn grubs in your garden, we recommend contacting us for a free lawn survey so we can assess the extent of the infestation and start to treat it before these pesky lawn grubs cause you too many problems!

Identifying a chafer grub:

If you see any lawn grubs in your garden with the following characteristics, then it’s likely that you have a chafer grub infestation.

  • 3 pairs of legs situated at the front of the body
  • A distinctive light brown/orange coloured head
  • Plump white body

Chafer grubs, like most lawn grubs, are eaten by foxes, badgers and a variety of birds including magpies and jackdaws. If you see any of these animals lingering suspiciously on your lawn and looking for food, it might be time to give us a call! For more information on our lawn grub control services, click the button below:

Chafer Grub Control Service >

 Leatherjackets

lawn grubs

Leatherjackets are baby crane flies – or crane fly larvae. You might be thinking, what’s a crane fly? Crane flies are much more commonly known by their nickname – Daddy Longlegs. During late autumn and early spring, these lawn grubs will feed ravenously on grass and plant roots, creating large patches of dry yellow grass as your lawn starts to die.

If you start to see these appearing, contact us for a free lawn survey to assess whether lawn grubs are causing the problem.

Identifying a leatherjacket:

If you spot a lawn grub with any of the following features, you might have a leatherjacket infestation in your garden.

  • No obvious legs
  • Brown/grey all over
  • Mandibles at one end

Leatherjackets are often eaten by crows and magpies. So, if you see any of these birds flocking to your lawn then you should investigate to see if you can spot any lawn grubs and give us a call. We offer a comprehensive leatherjacket control service that will help keep your lawn grub free! Find out more here:

Leatherjacket Control Service >

While lawn grubs like these can be a particular nuisance, we know they aren’t the only type of pest you might find on your lawn! For all of our lawn pest & insect control services, simply click the button here: Lawn Pest & Insect Control Services >

watering lawn at night

 

21st century life is a busy one for most working men and women in the UK. Balancing jobs, homelife and general admin on the go can be a full-time juggling act with little reprieve. Even retirees can have their hands full with family, health and hobbies all working their way into the daily diary.

If you happen to be feeling the pressure of a busy schedule, it’s all to easy to let some tasks slip by the wayside and watering the lawn is often one of them. While this may seem like a job that’s low down on the totem pole, for garden enthusiasts, it can be vitally important, particularly if you want to maintain your grass.

However, that doesn’t mean you should squeeze this task in when you can. There’s a time and place for everything and watering your grass at night could land you in hot water.

 

Is watering your lawn at night a good idea?

 

Okay, let’s wade through the weeds and jump right in at the deep end: should you water your lawn at night?

Simply put – no. When it comes to lawncare, watering at night can lead to a variety of unsightly issues and leave your luscious lawn looking notably under the weather.

As a rule of thumb, the later you leave it, the worse it is for your garden. Watering your lawn in the evening can promote mildew and fungus growth, while it can also attract pests as well.

Water can cling to blades of grass overnight which can, in turn, lead to lawn diseases and transform your prized plot into a patchy eyesore.

 

When is the best time to water your lawn?

 

During the spring and summer months when rainfall is theoretically less frequent (theoretically, at least), your lawn may require a little more TLC to keep it at peak performance – particularly when it comes to moisture.

The best time to water your lawn is typically in the morning. While the exact timing can vary from one expert to the next, before sunrise is generally considered ideal but anytime between 4:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. is also deemed acceptable.

 

Why should I water my lawn in the morning?

 

During the 4-10 window in the morning, the air is typically cooler than later on in the day when water can evaporate a lot faster. Meanwhile, the wind is also usually lighter, allowing the water droplets to remain where they are rather than blow away.

If watering your lawn in the a.m. is out of the question and an evening splash is simply unavoidable, its recommended that you water your lawn no later than 6:00 p.m. (ideally before). This gives your lawn a little time to soak up the moisture and dry before nightfall.

 

For more information on keeping your lawn green and healthy, drop us a line today on 0800 111 4958.

Alternatively, use the button below to request a free lawn survey and keep your garden in peak condition!

Get a FREE lawn survey!

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