Water on grass

Grass doesn't need to be watered as much as other plants. It enters a state of inactivity when moisture reaches a critical level, then resumes growth once it receives water again.

There are several other sound reasons for choosing not to water your grass, including when costs are high, when reservoirs are not being adequately replenished or when watering may do more harm than good.

On the other hand, there are several reasons why watering your grass might be a good idea after all - for example, if a wet surface is required for games and young children, or if you've undertaken some form of renovation and need to promote recovery. At other times, you may just need a light watering to soak moss before applying a ferrous sulphate-based moss killer or as part of a seeding/turfing process.

Whatever your reasons, you're still likely to ask yourself the question 'how often should I water my grass?' from time to time. And below, we try to help answer!

 

Watering your lawn

In short, you should water your grass when it tells you to, not according to some random plan. Your soil and grass type and exposure to sun and wind are just a few factors that will determine how often you need to be watering your grass. The level of fertiliser present in your grass may also have an impact on water levels, as an adequately fertilised lawn will tend to tolerate dry spells better than one lacking the required nutrients. This might mean some lawns require watering once a week, whilst others may only need water once a month in the exact same weather conditions.

Common signs to look out for that indicate your grass requires water are:

  • A change in colour with your grass becoming dull
  • Grass losing its 'bounce' with footprints remaining in the lawn once stepped on

 

How much water should I use?

You should try to water your grass deeply each time. Aim for at least half an inch for clay soils and an inch for sandy soils. An easy way to work this out is to place a few straight containers into your sprinkler to catch some water. Time the process until there is the required amount of water in the container so you'll know how long you need to water for. If you're on a water meter, there's no need to worry, as watering your grass for the required time and amount should still be affordable.

 

When should I water my grass?

Try to avoid watering your grass at night, as this promotes disease. The best time to water is before the heat of the day so that the lawn has enough time to dry before nightfall. You can set your sprinkler (if you have them) to turn on from 4 am to early afternoon on most days, even sunny ones. If the temperature gets above 24°C, however, then you should turn the water off. Also, if you have a disease on your lawn, such as red thread and fusarium, watering it can make it worse. So, be sure to inspect your lawn before you consider heavy watering.

 

How often should I water my lawn?

Watering your grass too little, too often or at the incorrect times promotes weeds, disease, moss, weed grasses and shallow rooting. Therefore, it is important to understand when and how often to water your grass because you may be doing more harm than good. Sometimes, soil becomes very hard to re-wet once it has dried out as a result of a fungal condition such as dry patch. By using a wetting agent, you can aid water penetration and retention in most circumstances.

We hope this blog has helped to answer your question of how often to water grass. For more information on how often you should water your lawn or to speak to one of our lawn care specialists regarding your lawn, please get in touch with us today.

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Waterlogged Lawn

If there’s one thing that us Brits know what to deal with, it’s rain, rain and more rain.

Unfortunately for us, we are more than used to our fair share of the wet stuff, so have become accustomed to working and living through it, especially our lawns. This often results in puddles and damp patches, known as waterlogging, that prevent us from taking part in our favourite garden past times, sports or simply enjoying the outdoors.

 

What causes a waterlogged lawn?

Waterlogged lawns occur when water builds up as a result of excessive rain and is unable to drain away or dry up, which can present a number of problems. Firstly, the presence of water itself can inhibit the supply of oxygen to the grassroots, which in turn can impact the health of the lawn. Second, waterlogged lawns can prevent carbon dioxide in the air from diffusing. The functionality of the grassroots is decreased or halted completely as they start to diminish, which allows the invasion of rot and decay organisms to take place. Thirdly, essential nutrients found within the lawn can be leached out which results in hungry, deprived soil as well as serious compaction. The lawn itself can also thin out, creating an environment where thatch and moss will pitch-in to the new gaps and thrive in the damper conditions.

 

Preventing a waterlogged lawn

To prevent your lawn from becoming waterlogged in the event of a severe downpour, there are a number of steps that you can take. The main method of prevention, however, is to regularly aerate your lawn. This allows plenty of drainages and air to reach deep into the soil. The best form of aeration for this type of work is known as ‘hollow tine aeration’ as this creates optimum airflow and drainage to the lower levels of soil. Once the lawn has been aerated, you can then re-seed to allow seeds the opportunity to germinate and create a thicker, more complex root system.

It’s important to observe your lawn during patches of rain in order to identify problem areas. These may occur as a result of uneven patches where the water has nowhere to drain. To counter this, be sure to level out uneven patches and aerate to prevent waterlogging from happening.

 

Dealing with a waterlogged lawn

  • Short-term solutions – If your waterlogged lawn was caused by flooding, the first things you can do to rectify it is to wash down hard surfaces and pick up debris to prevent drains from being blocked, allowing a steady flow of water to remove pollutants. Try to avoid stepping on the soil, as doing so will compact the lawn and make the conditions worse. Remove any damaged shoots from affected grass plants. If the waterlogging has occurred during the spring, you can apply a balanced fertiliser to improve growth.
  • Long-term solutions – If you have serious waterlogged lawns, we suggest you try to improve the soil structure and drainage system. The most popular drainage systems are known as land drains and French drains. Both of these consist of a trench or series of trenches that are dug into the lawn and lined with a porous film. The trench is then filled with graded stone before being topped off with topsoil so that the relaid turf on the surface returns to being level and even with the rest of the lawn.

The difference between the two types of drains is that a land drain also has a pipe which is often perforated, attached along its length to transport excess water away faster and more efficiently. In both cases, the trenches are dug at a shallow angle in order for the water to flow along the trench by gravity to a strategically-placed soakaway. From here, it is guided to disperse harmlessly underground. The purpose of the porous film is to filter out silt from any water that is washed into the trench. If this filtration didn’t exist, both types of drains can easily become clogged with silt and become overwhelmed with the water they aim to funnel away.

 

Are you experiencing a waterlogged lawn? Do you require professional help to even out or aerate your lawn? Be sure to get in touch with the expert lawn care team here at Lawn & Weed Expert today by filling out our lawn survey!

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If you want to add a touch of sparkle to your garden, why not consider adding some creative lawn edging? Don't let that extra space around the perimeter of your garden go to waste, there are so many different ways you can utilise it and get creative. We've come up with a selection of lawn edging ideas to spark your imagination. 

Natural Rocks

To give your garden a rustic feel, you could add a selection of natural rocks as edging around your lawn. Whether you choose large natural stone blocks or smaller pebbles to create your border you can rest assured that your new lawn border will look great against the soft green grass of your lawn.

You can find large pieces of natural stone from a local building supplier, and bags of pebbles in your local hardware store. Use a contrasting coloured mulch underneath the stones for a striking look. 

Wooden Sleepers

If you want to create a bold statement in your garden, why not upcycle some planks of wood to create your lawn edging? Creating straight lines in natural materials like wood draw the eye without distracting from the beauty of your garden. Some people find wood is a far more aesthetically pleasing option when compared to manmade materials like concrete or bricks can contrast with your lawn in a way that's not always appealing.

When choosing wood for your garden edging, we recommend Redwood and Cedar because they won't rot over time. However, you could use large wooden logs, pallets or any spare wood that you like.

Flower Beds

A simple flower bed with an array of your favourite flowers can really bring your lawn edging to life. Create a simple border around the perimeter of your lawn, fill the edging with soil and mulch and plant flowers and plants to your heart's content. During the spring and summer months, this multicoloured lawn edging spectacle will fill your garden with a wonderful floral aroma and will look wonderful against your luscious green grass. 

Adding lovely lawn edging is all well and good, but if your lawn is not looking its best, your efforts will be for nothing! To keep your lawn looking its best, get in touch with the Lawn and Weed Expert team.

Eco-Friendly Lawn

With the new year and new decade upon us, many homeowners are taking the time to reflect on their lifestyles and make some positive changes - both for themselves and for the environment.

There's been much talk of climate change and humanity's impact on the environment in recent years (thanks in no small part to young activists like Greta Thunberg) so it should come as no surprise that more and more people are choosing to go green. Lately, we're seeing loads solar panels on roofs, electric cars on the road, and smart meters being used to measure energy usage - in all these ways and more besides, we're paying increasingly close attention to how our actions affect the world around us.

But did you know that the way you treat your lawn can also have an impact on the environment! No? Well, it can. Here are five tips that you can follow for a more eco-friendly lawn:

  1. Rainwater Irrigation – The next time you water your lawn, consider the ways in which you can conserve water. Now, we’re not talking about stopping watering your lawn completely or reducing the amount of time you spend watering your lawn, but maybe using rainwater instead. Since the UK has more than enough rainfall throughout the year, it’s more than likely that your lawn gets its fair share of watering, but throughout the summer when we do go through weeks (and sometimes months) of dry spells, it can be extremely useful to use rainwater to water your lawn rather than your property’s water system. You can gather rainwater and store it in drums for future use. All that is required is to catch the water as it flows out of your gutter downspouts and use an electric pump to create enough water pressure to power your very own irrigation system!

  1. Install a no-mow lawnMowing the lawn can sometimes be an arduous and time-consuming task, especially if the weather isn’t favourable. In this case, the last place you want to be is outside, with grass flying all over the place. So, how can you avoid this problem? Install a no-mow lawn! There are several grassalternatives that you can install that require no mowing at all, such as astroturf. Not only are you avoiding the actual task of mowing, you are also reducing the amount of energy that you use. Another great way that you can do this is by hardscaping. Instead of having grass, why not build a desert or rock scene? Hardscaping requires no maintenance at all, and your energy usage will decrease dramatically.

  1. Use eco-friendly lawn care equipment – To reduce their impact on the environment, many people choose to ditch their cars and walk (or maybe cycle). The same can be done with your lawn care equipment! You know that big, gas-guzzling lawn mower that you have stored away in the shed? Well, why not replace it with an electric one? You can find both corded and cordless lawn equipment at any home department retailer. Despite not performing as well as gas-powered tools, battery-powered tools are a great option due to their portability, and this is where you’ll make the most difference in your quest to create an eco-friendly lawn.

  1. Using biopesticides – Historically, insecticides have been used as a form of lawn insect control. However, research has shown that these have an adverse effect on the animals that come into contact with them e.g. causing reproductive ailments in birds such as thinner eggshells. An example of manmade chemical improving the quality of life for humans at the expense of the wider environment. A fantastic alternative that can be used are biopesticides, a chemical that is growing in popularity due to its controlling of insects rather than killing. Here, only targeted insects are affected with no adverse effects on other animals.

  1. Properly disposing of lawn waste – Disposing of garden waste correctly is another great way that you can help the environment with an eco-friendly lawn. Mulch and compost are garden wastes that have been organically broken down and recycled by Mother Nature, but you need to lend a helping hand in the process. The first and easiest thing that you can do is to mulch whilst you mow. This can be done by using a mulching blade on your mower. The second way you can help is by bagging clippings for disposal and the third is by composting. Composting recycles organic materials to be spread back into the earth for nutritional purposes.

 

And there you have it! Five great ways to make your lawn more eco-friendly. If you have any other queries or your lawn needs some professional care, please get in touch with the Lawn and Weed Expert team today.

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While it's commonly believed that grass stops growing during the winter months due to cold weather, this is actually a misconception.

During mild spells, grass does actually continue growing in winter (albeit at a far slower rate than usual). As such, neglecting your lawn during this time can be a regrettable oversight.

Lawn in winter

Winter is Coming

Keeping your grass healthy and keeping moss at bay should be your top priorities in winter. (Promoting grass growth takes a back seat.)

During this time, it's vital to keep an eye on two things in particular:

  • Nitrogen levels
  • Iron levels

In order to keep your lawn as healthy as possible during the winter months, nitrogen levels need to be very low and iron levels need to be very high.

High nitrogen levels over winter can lead to lawn disease and leave the lawn susceptible to pests, while a deficiency in iron can be detrimental in terms of grass colour and turf strength.

 

How Can I Give My Lawn Enough Iron?

Many gardeners opt for lawn sand during the winter months as the go-to remedy for repelling moss and boosting lawn health; however, it's worth keeping an eye on the content of your lawn sand of choice.

It's not unusual for pre-made lawn sand mixtures to contain a pitiful amount of iron. As such, in order to provide enough iron to really benefit the grass, you will need to use a lot - unfortunately, this will also increase the nitrogen levels.

To avoid such a catch 22, it's worth either shopping around for lawn sand with a higher iron content than nitrogen, or making your own winter lawn fertiliser.

The latter option can be particularly handy and cost-effective, since you can make as much as you need and know exactly what has gone into making it, including the nutrient levels.

 

Winter Fertilisers

If you do happen to go down the ready-made route and shop for your winter lawn fertiliser, there are a couple of things to keep in mind.

When shopping for winter lawn fertiliser, the label should include three letters (N, P and K). These represent the chemical elements of nitrogen, phosphate and potassium.

A good winter grass fertiliser should include higher levels of phosphate and potassium to encourage root growth and strengthen the lawn under the soil.

Meanwhile, any decent winter lawn fertiliser should also have a lower level of nitrogen to discourage rapid grass growth during this time.

 

Professional Winter Lawn Treatment

If the prospect of treating your lawn during the winter seems somewhat daunting, why not give us a call and let us work our wintry magic?

At Lawn & Weed Expert, our winter lawn treatment is specifically designed to keep your lawn in tip-top condition throughout the cold season and banish lawn moss from whence it came.

Our team of lawn care specialists are fully equipped with knowledge, experience and tools for the task at hand, and are all ready, willing and able to give your lawn a healthy dose of TLC this winter.

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