When it comes to keeping one's lawn healthy, serious gardeners will know how important it is to stay on top of things and keep the grass well maintained.

That being said, even if you’re not an avid gardener, it doesn’t take Alan Titchmarsh to run the mower over the lawn to keep your garden from becoming a jungle.

After all, when the sun’s got its hat on, the garden can be a really great place to enjoy some downtime, whether you’re kicking a ball around with the kids or simply kicking back with a beer or two.

However, Mother Nature does have a habit of throwing a green-handled spanner in the works from time to time. From a lawn care perspective, this can often come in the form of grass fungus and lawn disease.

Know your enemy and keep your garden from falling foul of fungus with this handy guide to the most common lawn diseases in the UK.

grass fungus types

Common types of grass fungus

Grass fungus can ruin a lawn almost beyond repair, so it's important to know what you're looking for. Here are three of the worst offenders to look out for in your garden:

Lawn Rust

As the name suggests, this bothersome blemish can leave an unsightly copper-brown stain on your beautiful green lawn, making it look more like military camouflage than the viridescent showroom shade of old. Worse still, lawn rust can often spread wildly due to the high volume of spore coverage.

Like any rustable element, the best way to avoid rust is to stay active. Actively keeping your lawn well-maintained throughout the year will help keep rust at bay, so be sure to remove excess thatch and keep your lawn well fertilised. However, take care to avoid fertilisers rich in nitrogen as this can have an adverse effect.

Lawn rust thrives on stressed, unhealthy grass and is especially common during summer periods of drought. As such, it’s important to take particular care during the summer months, when hot weather and reduced rainfall can have a significant impact.

If lawn rust has already hooked its coppery claws into your grass, it can be difficult to remove, even with the aid of an all-purpose fungicide. Patience is a virtue and, in this case, you’re just going to have to be very virtuous – it will go in time, so be prepared to ride out the storm.

Red Thread

Clawing its way into your garden as early as late springtime, this summery fungus is a bit like acne for your lawn. Red thread causes patches of pale, reddish pink to appear in blotchy spots across your garden.

Incredibly common in the UK, red thread is often mistaken for drought. However, it actually thrives in mild, damp conditions.

To avoid an invasion from the dreaded thread of red, ensure your garden has an efficient drainage system. Scarification to remove excess thatch can also help prevent red thread, while evening watering should also be avoided.

If you are too late for preventative measures, fungicide is a wise course of action. While this won’t cure existing patches, it will help to stop them in their tracks, allowing healthy green grass to grow back in its place. Iron sulphate can help give your lawn a fighting chance of recovery, while also helping to avoid a rematch.

Snow Mould

The troublesome twin of red thread, snow mould is the autumn/winter equivalent of its spring/summer sibling. Named for its penchant for growth under snow cover, snow mould is characterised by yellowy rings, often accompanied by a slimy white covering that can resemble cobwebs.

Healthy lawns can fight back, whereas a weaker surface may be vulnerable to attack. A well-fertilised lawn, rich in nutrients, will stand the best chance of fending off this frost-loving fiend, while iron sulphate is once again an iron-clad prevention method that’s well worth using.

As with red thread, prevention is better than cure, so scarification and drainage are your best allies here. If you are too late and snow mould has already taken hold, fungicide is again the best defence. Remove dead grass and reseed if necessary, taking care to take the aforementioned preventative steps in future to avoid a relapse.

Top tips for removing grass fungus

Aside from the the usual suspects listed above, grass fungus can come in many forms and strike at various times of the year in a variety of conditions. That being said, like any living organism, a lawn that’s healthy and strong stands the best chance of fighting off these disruptive diseases.

As the old saying goes, defence is the best form of attack, so keep your guard up all year round by effectively maintaining your lawn. Removal of thatch via scarification is a great way to avoid a fungal fright, as is fertilisation.

Be sure to keep an eye on your lawn, scarify when necessary, and ensure it's well fertilised from season to season. Iron sulphate is a great all-purpose fungus deterrent that’s effective on a variety of common fungi, so don’t be afraid to give your lawn a visit from the Iron Man to lay down the law on your lawn.

So there you have it: a handful of top tips to keep your lawn fungus free. For more info on how to maintain your lawn, get in touch with Lawn & Weed Expert today!

Request a FREE Survey

beach

So, you’ve changed your money, your passport is safely packed, and the dog is already raising hell at your sister’s house – everything is ready for your holiday!

Everything, that is, except your garden.

Often overshadowed by getaway fever, the back garden tends to be quite a long way down the list of priorities when holiday time rolls around. Naturally, the excitement of the trip takes over and the state of your lawn typically falls off the radar, overlooked in favour of packing and pre-journey anticipation.

That being said, for those with green fingers, gardens are a big deal and seeing all your hard work undone by a week in the sun can be heartbreaking.

Luckily, that doesn’t have to be the case! In this blog, we take a look at some top tips for looking after your garden while you're away on holiday.

More...

Lawn feeding tips

Much like a growing child, a Christmas turkey or a prize marrow at the county fayre, success in the garden can often come down to a solid feeding regime  - particularly when it comes to growing a luscious lawn.

A nutritious diet is key to healthy growth for virtually all living organisms, and that includes the grass in your back garden. Neglecting to feed your lawn is a good way to turn the grass brown.

Don't force your lawn into a horticultural Hunger Games - keep it looking good with these lawn feeding tips from the pros here at Lawn & Weed Expert.

 More...

Lawn maintenance schedule

Your Lawn Maintenance Schedule

The best way to keep your lawn looking gorgeous all year round is to follow a lawn care schedule. We created this lawn maintenance schedule with help from our specialist lawn care team. Feel free to share it with your friends or print it off and stick it on your fridge!

Spring – February to May

  • Mow

Mow your grass periodically throughout spring to stop it growing wild!

  • Overseed

Plant more seeds than usual to improve the thickness of your lawn.

  • Top Dress

Add soul mixes to the surface of your lawn to improve soil quality.

  • Aerate

Puncture the soil to alleviate drainage issues, reduce compaction & improve filtration of nutrients.

  • Deal with Pests

Pests are most prevalent this time of year, avoid infestation by eradicating them early.

  • Scarify

Remove moss and thatch from your lawn.

  • Treat Weeds

Apply herbicides to prevent your weeds from growing.

Need some assistance with your spring lawn care? Contact us now!

 

Summer – May to August

  • Mow

Mow your lawn throughout summer, it will still be growing rapidly!

  • Water

If summer is particularly hot, keep your lawn hydrated with a good amount of water twice per week.

  • Deal with Pests

Ants often build their nests in summer. Sweep them away or pour hot soapy water over the area.

Is your lawn not looking as healthy as it should this summer? We can help.

 

Autumn – August to November

  • Mow

Mow your grass in Autumn, it may be the last proper dry spell until spring!

  • Overseed

Plant more seeds than usual to improve the thickness of your lawn.

  • Aerate

We often experience rain in autumn, aerate your lawn to ventilate it and stop compaction.

  • Moss Control

Moss thrives in damp conditions, be sure to treat & remove it before it spreads.

  • Disease Protection

Diseases also thrive in damp (sometimes warm) autumn months. Check for fungus or unusual dry/yellow patches. Speak to a professional to treat your grass diseases properly.

Contact us if you need any help keeping your lawn healthy this Autumn!

 

Winter – November to February

  • Clear

As the leaves fall from the trees, they can smother your lawn. Use a rake to clear them away.

  • Aerate

Puncture the soil if you notice there is water is building upon the surface of your lawn.

  • Fertilize

Use a specially formulated winter lawn feed to keep your lawn healthy in the harsh conditions.

If your lawn is suffering this winter, speak to our specialists!

For more lawn care advice and information on lawn maintenance, click here:

Lawn Care Advice >

A nightmare scenario for lawn lovers nationwide, the sight of brown, patchy grass can leave an instant eye-sore and insight an immediate pain in the butt.

Brown patches in your garden are a tell-tale sign of dead or dying grass. Light a candle, sing a hymn and hold a minute silence – it’s as good as done for.

Or is it?

Pull on your scrubs, grab a de-fib and prepare to play Garden God as we discover just how to revive a dead lawn.

how to fix dead grass in summer

Reasons for dying grass

If deprived of water for a prolonged period of time, grass can naturally become dormant. Worse still, this can happen in as little as two to three weeks.

Luckily, one of the few upsides of British weather is that we very rarely have a spell of sun long enough to permanently put our lawns to bed and the risk of a light nap is probably the worst you can expect.

However, it’s not just water that can turn your garden into a barren wasteland. There are many reasons for dying grass, ranging from poor maintenance to Mother Nature.

Discovering which one led to your garden’s demise is vital in knowing how to treat it – so be prepared to play the role of Shrubbery Sherlock.

 

Drought

Perhaps the most common reason for dying grass, aforementioned demon drought can quickly turn a sunny spell into a death knell for your lawn. Like humans and animals, lack of water can take its toll and the plant world is no different.

Mowing

While it can theoretically prolong the period between cuts, mowing your lawn too short can cause untold damage to the grass – which could leave to a very long period between cuts indeed. If your lawn is left looking brown and bare, it’s likely you’ve been a bit too liberal with the blades.

Watering

It’s recommended that your lawn receive a good coverage of water once a week. Naturally, the weather conditions will dictate whether it needs more or less, but this is a good rule of thumb to go by. Over-watering or under-watering could lead your lawn to an untimely demise.

Insects

Pests can drain the life out of a lawn in no time, so it’s important to keep them at bay. Infested lawns surfaces peel back easily like a carpet so give the area the tug test if you suspect an infestation.

Fungus

Patchy brown areas can also be a giveaway of fungus damage on your lawn. Worse still, falling foul of fungus can quickly kill off your lawn, turning your green garden into a beige bomb site.

Pets

Do you or your neighbours own pets? If you/they do, your four-legged friends could well be the culprits for your fawny lawn. Nitrogen present in dog and cat urine can be lethal for your lawn, so be sure to keep tabs on Tiddles and a keen eye on Fido.

how to fix dead grass in summer

Reviving a dead lawn

Okay, so you’ve got to the bottom of your grassy grief – now what?

Luckily, there are a few sure-fire ways to cure your summertime sadness. It’s not unusual for Britain to endure a prolonged spell of sun out of the blue, so be sure to keep an eye on your grass during a lengthy summer heatwave.

Lack of water is the most common problem associated with dead lawns, particularly in the summer months. If you’re wondering how to fix dead grass in summer, the watering can should be your first port of call.

Even if this isn’t the main reason for your garden’s demise, watering is a great way to ensure your grass stays healthy in the future. In short, keeping your garden moist with regular watering is definitely a wise move.

Better still, thorough watering can prevent and cure damage done by dog/cat urine. Watering in the morning time is highly advisable as this can also help reduce the risk of fungus as well.

Speaking of fungus, this can be caused by a build-up of thatch so be sure to remove dethatch areas affected. Liberal use of fungicide will kill any persistent cases.

Finally, keep pests at bay by not over fertilising your lawn. Like fungus, use of pesticides can rid your lawn of these turf dwelling menaces once and for all.

 

Tips for a reviving a lawn

Overall, there are a few steps that you can take to help drag your lawn from the jaws of defeat. Stick by these and you won’t go far wrong:

  • Water weekly in the morning time
  • Don’t over-water or over-fertilise
  • Trim regularly but don’t scalp
  • Use fungicides and pesticides if necessary

 

If you’re still unsure how to rescue your lawn from dying a slow and browny death, give us a call on 0800 111 4958. Alternatively, why not let us take a look? Click below and book a FREE garden survey now!

Request a FREE Survey

Contact Lawn and Weed Expert

Name *
E-mail address *
Location *
Telephone Number *
Your Message
 
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character
Enter Letters (No Spaces) *
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character