To get the best results from your garden turf, we recommend laying it in early to mid-autumn.

Turf ready to lay

While turf lawns tend to be more expensive than a naturally-grown seed lawn, the instant transformation can be worth every penny. For the impatient gardener, there's no contest - it's lawn over seed every time.

Revamping your garden can be an exciting prospect, so let's not waste any time mucking around in the dirt! Grab a set of gardening gloves, dust off your finest fork and let's jump straight into the best time to lay turf.

 

When to lay turf

If you're looking to tune up your garden some fresh turf, knowing when to do it can be a hugely important factor. Laying too early or too late could be setting yourself up for an almighty fall and mistiming your lay-day could see your freshly-laid lawn go downhill fast.

While the exact timing can vary from one expert to the next, the best time to lay turf is typically considered to be early to mid-autumn. The BBC says early; RHS says mid - we'll let you decide who's the authority on that one...

Autumn in the UK is typically considered to be between late September and late December, so - according to the timeline given by BBC/RHS - any time within the month of October would fit the bill perfectly. During this period, the grass will be able to root into the soil more easily, providing a secure foundation for your budding lawn.

 

How to lay turf

For the best advice on turf laying, a key lesson can be learnt from nu-metal icons, Limp Bizkit. While their gardening credentials may be a tad suspect at best, there's no arguing that their song Rollin' is loaded with lawn laying tips.

Simple, yet effective, the chorus of "Keep rollin', rollin', rollin', rollin'" should be the anthem of turf layers worldwide. It seems the Limp Bizkit lads could have had a lucrative career in turf laying if the whole music thing didn't pan out. And, if gigs ever dry up, who's to say they still won't?

However, there's actually a lot more to laying turf than simply rollin', rollin', rollin', rollin'. It's a good idea to prep your soil beforehand, skimming off any old grass and removing any stones, weeds and lumps.

Fill in any holes and fork over to ensure a level surface, taking extra time to rake for a fine finish. To further bolster your new lawn's chances, add a layer of fertiliser across the surface and water for good measure.

 

Tips for laying turf

Now that the soil is primed and ready for a new coat of colour, it's time to get your hands dirty and layer up. To ensure uniform coverage, it's wise to lay your first roll of turf along a straight edge.

When rolling, try not to be too hasty in your approach. Slow and steady is the name of the game; slowly unravelling your turf will help you avoid damaging it.

Once your first roll is down, lay your second strip tight and up-close to the last. Continue this trend until the whole area is covered.

When rolling your turf, it's also a good idea to let the turf run over the edge of your lawn area and trim to fit, rather than pre-cut to fit the space. Adding soil beneath the cut edges will prevent it from drying out.

You can ensure your turf has made a healthy connection with the ground beneath by firmly pressing down on the surface. Ideally, this can be done with a garden roller; however, it can also be easily accomplished with a tamper or the reverse side of a rake.

 

Maintaining your turf

Once your turf has been laid, now is the perfect time to sit back, relax and take in the satisfaction of a job well done. If you could then continue to do so for several weeks, that would be great, as freshly laid turf can take weeks to fully root. Avoid walking on your new lawn during this time as much as possible.

If you need to trim your new lawn over the wintertime (once the grass reaches around the 5cm mark), be sure to keep your mower blades set to high. Immediately balding your new lawn would be like giving yourself a buzzcut after getting a hair transplant and defeat the object of the whole thing.

 

Professional turf laying

While the above tips can be handy for anyone dead set on laying their own turf, it's worth remembering that turf laying isn't quite as easy as it sounds. Laying down turf yourself may save money short term but could cost you big time in the long run and finding the best time to lay your turf may be an even bigger headache.

If you really want to give your garden the TLC it deserves, why not consider getting your turf laid professionally? At Lawn & Weed Expert, we provide a high-quality turf laying service that will bring out the best in your garden and ensure you get the perfect finish.

Request a FREE Lawn Survey

From seasonal lawn treatments to weed control and pest management, we provide a lot of different services here at Lawn & Weed Expert. When you get down to it, though, our ultimate goal is always more or less the same: to make our customers' gardens greener, healthier and lovelier to look at!

If you want an example of the results we can achieve, just take a look at this 'before and after' photo of one of our most recent jobs:

Lawn Treatment Before and After

What a difference, eh? That transformation is the result of our specialist lawn treatment service, which is available in Cardiff, Newport, Swansea, and most other locations in South Wales.

While the specifics change depending on the time of year (e.g. specialist fertiliser in early spring, or heavy moss control if winter's on its way), our service almost always begins with a free lawn survey. This initial visit allows us to assess the current condition of your lawn and identify what it will take to turn your dull brown grass into a lush green delight.

If your lawn needs some TLC, please don't hesitate to contact the Lawn & Weed Expert team today!

Request a Free Lawn Survey >

If you've spent the time laying new turf or spreading grass seed to try and improve the look of your lawn, then it's important you feed it properly to see the best results. Applying the wrong kind of fertiliser to your lawn can actually do it more harm than good, so don't go spreading any old fertiliser! Keep reading this blog to find out how and when you should fertilise your new lawn, or, get in touch with Lawn & Weed Expert and we'll select and apply the right kind of fertiliser to your lawn, so you don't have to worry about it!

High-Quality Soil:

One thing to bear in mind while deciding whether or not to fertilise your new lawn is the composition of the soil it's laid on/growing in. If you planted grass seed or laid turf over soil that is rich in organic material & nutrients, you may not have to fertilise your new lawn until it has had a couple of months to grow.

Similarly, if you applied a pre-turf fertiliser between the existing soil and your new turf, this should keep the new lawn fed while it establishes - requiring only regular watering to keep it happy! Once your new lawn has had plenty of time to establish & is starting to look green and luscious, it's wise to apply a slow release fertiliser that will help the lawn matures.

Poor-Quality Soil:

If the soil that you're laying turf or planting grass seed on is of poorer quality, you might want to apply a fertiliser that is rich in nutrients, often referred to as a 'starter fertiliser'. The type of fertiliser you should look for in this case is one that is rich in phosphorous and potassium. These minerals will promote root growth & robust grass blades, which is perfect for a new lawn.

Fertilisers that contain lots of nitrogen promote quick growth, but can actually put too much stress on young lawns and can stimulate the growth of weeds! 

Unsure About the Quality of Your Soil?

Don't worry, we aren't all experts when it comes to soil composition. The best thing to do if you're unsure what fertiliser your new lawn needs is to get a free lawn survey from the lawn care specialists here at Lawn & Weed Expert, or head to our lawn fertilisation page to read more.

Request a FREE Lawn Survey >

If you have any further questions about fertilising your new lawn, don't hesitate to give us a call on 0800 111 4958 and a member of our team will be happy to help you! 

 

 

 

Laying a lawn

Laying a lawn is not your average gardening task, doing it correctly takes careful planning, preparation and patience. If you are interested in laying a lawn in your garden, why not contact the professionals? Here at Lawn & Weed Expert, we can supply and lay your new lawn stress-free! Enquire today about our turf laying service.

However, if you want to learn how to lay a lawn all by yourself, this blog is here to help! Here, we talk you through the important steps of how to lay a lawn so that you're not left stuck in the mud. 

More...

There aren’t many things as pleasing to a gardener’s eye than a beautifully balanced, level lawn that’s light, bright and lusciously green.

However, even a beautifully maintained lawn can become uneven over time. Sadly, unless you plan on switching to wooden decking or patio paving, that’s one thing you’ll have to get used to.

Bumpy lawns can be a real eye-sore for any garden, while also posing a potential risk to young children or elderly family.

Level the playing field and flatten your earthy opposition with these top tips for fixing a bumpy lawn.

 

how to fix a bumpy lawn,how to fix an uneven lawn

 

What causes a bumpy lawn?

Bumpy lawns are a common sight in gardens nationwide and aren’t so much of a possibility than they are an inevitability.

This could be down to a variety of reasons: be it weeds, wildlife or simply the weather. Meanwhile, children or pets can also have an effect on the lay of your land when they dig into the surface of your lawn.

While some of these elements are virtually impossible to avoid, there are a few handy ways to fix these bumpy blemishes when they do eventually occur.

 

Rolling in the deep?

While it may be tempting to simply flatten your turf with a heavy lawn roller, this option is often unsuccessful when it comes to uneven garden surfaces.

If anything, more often than not, this option only damages your lawn further by compacting the soil beneath, which can have a lasting negative effect on the grass.

Uneven lawn surfaces are often the result of dips and dents, making rolling a non-factor. Instead, try to do a bit of detective work beforehand and see just what is causing your lawn to take a slump.

 

How to fix an uneven lawn

Before you can fix your bumpy lawn, it’s important to know what’s causing the issue to begin with. While this can be difficult to ascertain for issues involving weather and wildlife, man-made problems can be easier to identify and may involve a different course of action.

 

The root of the problem

When diagnosing exactly what is causing your once-level lawn to take a dip, there are a couple of tell-tale signs that can point to the main culprit.

Uneven ground can be the result of poor drainage. If the lumps occur in areas around water pipes, it may be an issue relating to damaged water pipes.

Drainage problems such as this could require additional groundwork, so it’s worth seeking the advice of a professional if you do suspect you have a water issue in your garden.

 

Levelling shallow spots

If water damage isn’t the cause of your problems, you may be able to solve the issue yourself with a bit of garden DIY. When looking to fix a low spot in your garden, topdressing these dents is a great way to level your lawn in the least invasive way possible.

Combining compost, topsoil and sand, simply apply this muddy cocktail to the low patches, being careful not to smother the grass underneath with too much coverage. Use about half an inch of the mixture and rake to achieve an even spread. Brush the mixture through to ensure a thorough coverage of topdressing between the blades of grass in the affected area.

Over time, the earthy mixture should begin to blend in with the rest of the grass. If not, repeat the previous steps until the whole area is level and green. If there are spots of bare soil, over-seed to ensure an even coverage of grass.

 

Levelling deeper spots

The topdressing method of half an inch deep at a time can be a good solution for shallow dents but a time-consuming process for any dips of notable depth. For these problem patches, you can simply pad out the area beneath the surface.

This can be done by removing the surface turf (aka, “sod”) intact and filling the dented area below with topsoil, adding water to the topsoil as you go to remove air pockets. Once you have added enough dirt to level the ground, simply replace the turf, water the grass and let nature take its course!

If your problem area is larger than one square foot, it may be worth removing the turf in smaller chunks. Anything bigger than one foot can be difficult to replace in one piece, making it a real awkward sod indeed.

 

Levelling multiple problem areas

If your lawn is overrun by more craters and dents than a Spartan’s shield, you may need to consider a more extensive solution and potentially entertain the idea of a wholesale refurb of the lawn.

Re-grading your lawn can be a somewhat drastic option to take, but it can also be an extremely effective tactic in the long run – particularly if you are inundated with dips and dents. Think of it as wiping the slate clean and starting from scratch, giving you an entirely new, fresh canvas to play with.

 

For a professional opinion, why not give us a call? Our team of experts can advise you with the best course of action and even provide you with a FREE lawn survey. Simply give us a call on 0800 111 4958 or contact us via the box below.

 

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